Allen Institute for Cell Science launches first predictive and comprehensive 3D model

first_imgMay 9 2018The Allen Institute for Cell Science today launched the first predictive and comprehensive, 3D model of a live human cell, the Allen Integrated Cell. By allowing researchers around the world to see many structures inside a living cell together at the same time, the Allen Integrated Cell provides a baseline for understanding cells and studying human disease models.”This is a new way to see inside living human cells,” said Rick Horwitz, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Allen Institute for Cell Science. “It’s like seeing the whole cell for the first time. In the future, this will impact drug discovery, disease research and how we frame basic studies involving human cells.””Nearly every biologist has mental models of whole cells that are pieced together over their careers with information from dozens of different types of data,” said Graham Johnson, Ph.D., Director of the Animated Cell. “The Allen Integrated Cell provides a new option, where 3-D visualizations of whole living cells link to analysis tools to allow for more direct data-driven exploration and hypothesis generation.”The Allen Integrated Cell summarizes a large collection of live human cells, gene edited by Allen Institute scientists to incorporate fluorescent protein tags. These tags illuminate specific structures inside of cells, such as the nucleus and mitochondria. Scientists took pictures of tens of thousands of these glowing cells and used artificial intelligence to study them.First, researchers developed a computer algorithm that studied the shape of the plasma membrane, the nucleus and other fluorescently labeled cell structures to learn their spatial relationships. A powerful probabilistic model emerged from this training, that accurately predicts the most probable shape and location of structures in any cell, based solely on the shape of the plasma membrane and the nucleus.Second, researchers took images of those same fluorescently labeled cells and applied a different machine learning algorithm. This algorithm used what it learned from cells with fluorescent labels to find cellular structures in cells without fluorescent labels. This label-free model can be used on relatively easy to collect brightfield microscope images to visualize the integration of many structures inside of cells, simultaneously and with high precision. Viewed side-by-side, the images generated by the label-free method look nearly identical to the fluorescently labeled photographs of cells.Related StoriesAbcam Acquire Off-The-Shelf Diploid Library of Over 2,800 Knockout Cell LinesNANOLIVE‘s novel CX-A defines a new standard for live cell imaging in 96 well plates for continuous organelle monitoring in cell populationsStudy: Megakaryocytes play an important role in cell migration”Fluorescence microscopy is expensive and toxic to cells; increasingly so when you tag multiple structures,” said Molly Maleckar, Ph.D., Director of Modeling. “Our approach allows scientists to view cells and conduct experiments at the reduced cost of brightfield microscopy, with the structure-identifying power of fluorescence microscopy – and without its toxic effects. It’s really the best of both worlds.””Until now, our ability to see what is going on inside of human cells has been very limited,” said Michael Elowitz, Ph.D., Professor of Biology, Bioengineering, and Applied Physics at California Institute of Technology. “Previously, we could only see the proteins that we deliberately labeled. But the Allen Integrated Cell is like the ultimate free lunch. We get to sample a ‘buffet’ of many different proteins and organelles, without having to label anything at all. This opens up a totally new and much more powerful way of doing cell biology. It’s a total game changer.”Rolling out alongside the Allen Integrated Cell is the Visual Guide to Human Cells: an online interactive overview of human cell structure and function. Users can explore how cells change throughout phases of the cell cycle. Both of these resources, as well as cell lines, tools and models, are publicly available on the Allen Cell Explorer atSource: https://www.alleninstitute.org/last_img read more

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Genevacs Rocket Evaporator used as sample preparation tool to improve natural product

first_imgRelated StoriesMonitoring Routine Pharmaceutical Freeze Drying with Tunable Diode Laser Absorption SpectroscopySP Scientific’s new series of advanced freeze dryers offer fully aseptic operationUsing LyoSpeed technology to avoid residual solvent when drying HPLC fractionsA Genevac Rocket Evaporator was chosen to dry the samples because of its high-volume sample capacity, unique technology that eliminates cross contamination due to sample bumping and automated monitoring of temperature and pressure to prevent sample degradation. Employing Genevac’s proprietary SampleGenie™ technology, with the Rocket Evaporator, enabled TUM scientists to dry samples directly into pre-weighed vials, reducing sample preparation time and facilitating straightforward determination of the extraction yield.Using a patented low temperature technology, the Genevac Rocket Evaporator has become a defacto standard for natural product researchers seeking to safely extract novel molecules from natural sources. To obtain fragrances from natural products – chemists and perfumers often employ organic solvent extraction techniques to produce a large volume of crude extract. This technique is preferable to steam distillation as the higher temperatures are prone to denaturing the delicate fragrance molecules and some materials do not yield their characteristic aroma using steam. To isolate individual fragrance components from the concentrated extract, one or two-dimensional chromatography is then often the technique of choice. The latest Rocket Synergy Evaporators offer integrated, flexible solutions for processing a wide range of sample volumes. Interchangeable rotors will accommodate tubes, flasks and batch volumes of up to 100 litres. Rocket Synergy evaporator and Gymnema sylvestre herb. May 17 2018Genevac has published a technical article that describes how its Rocket™ Evaporator has been used by the Technical University of Munich (Germany) as a sample preparation tool for extraction of active phytochemicals from the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre.center_img Source:http://genevac.co.uk/last_img read more

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Rookies lead the way on House science panel

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Jeffrey MervisFeb. 4, 2019 , 12:45 PM iStock.com/YayaErnst Email Four of the five—all women—were elected to Congress in November 2018 as part of the 40-seat blue wave. None has a scientific background, nor did any receive the endorsement of a pro-science organization, 314 Action, which backed more than a dozen House Democratic candidates.At the same time, only one of the eight new members of the House who made science a pillar of their campaigns and gained 314 Action’s backing has landed on the science committee. That is Representative Sean Casten (D–IL), a clean energy entrepreneur who defeated a longtime Republican incumbent. But Casten, a biochemical engineer who co-founded a company that helps firms become more energy efficient, will start out as a backbencher.Johnson’s leadership team consists of representatives Haley Stevens (D–MI), as chair of the research subcommittee; Kendra Horn (D–OK) atop the space subcommittee, Mikie Sherrill (D–NJ), who will lead investigations and oversight; and Lizzie Fletcher (D–TX), who will chair the environment subcommittee. The energy subcommittee will be led by Representative Conor Lamb (D–PA), who won a special election in March 2018 and earned a full 2-year term in November 2018. Horn, Sherrill, Fletcher, and Lamb are lawyers, and Stevens is a party activist who served briefly in former President Barack Obama’s administration.These new legislators got the chance to rise to the top because of the arcane House rules that determine committee assignments. The rules are intended to reward members who demonstrate a commitment to a particular committee by focusing their time and energy on its business, and it advanced the rookies over many members who have served much longer on the committee and in Congress. They will have a disproportionate impact on the science committee, representing nearly one-quarter of the 18 new members who earned subcommittee gavels across 20 standing House committees.In brief, a member who is chair of another committee or leads one of its subcommittees can’t hold two such leadership positions. Members of so-called “A” committees aren’t even allowed to serve on a second committee, although in some cases they can receive a waiver of that rule. And even if they do get a waiver, they lose their seniority on the second committee and are placed below any newbies.On the science panel, those rules both drastically shrunk the list of members eligible for leadership posts and boosted the chances of freshmen legislators. It knocked out of the running such longtime science advocates as Representative Daniel Lipinski (D–IL), who led the research panel when the Democrats were previously in the majority, and Representative Suzanne Bonamici (OR), the top Democrat on the environmental panel in the 115th Congress. Even Representative Bill Foster (D–IL), the only Ph.D. physicist in Congress, is far down the eligibility list because he also serves on the influential Committee on Financial Services.Joining Johnson as the only committee veteran in a leadership role is Representative Ami Bera (D–CA). Bera was chosen as vice chair, an honorary position that his predecessor, Representative Don Beyer (D–VA), used to be the party’s point person in its attacks on Republican initiatives. However, last month Beyer won a coveted spot on the Committee on Ways and Means, a so-called “exclusive” committee, knocking him out of consideration for a leadership spot on science.A physician and former clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, Davis, Bera won his fourth term in November 2018 by 10 points after two previous razor-thin victories. He is also the new chair of the oversight subcommittee of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, which made him ineligible for a subcommittee gavel.The science committee traditionally has had a hard time attracting and retaining members because, as Foster once noted, “you can’t raise money from it.” That’s shorthand for the fact that powerful lobbying groups give lavishly to the leaders of panels setting the country’s tax, energy, fiscal, and regulatory policies in hopes of gaining influence over pending legislation. In contrast, science policy rarely registers on the national political barometer.House Democratic leaders prevailed on veteran Representative Steve Cohen (D–TN) to fill the last Democratic vacancy on the science committee. To do so, Cohen, a lawyer who is the incoming chair of the constitution and civil rights panel of the influential House Committee on the Judiciary and who also serves on the transportation committee, was granted a waiver to add science to a lineup that includes the transportation and ethics committees.Republicans, meanwhile, are still scrambling to fill the last two vacancies on their 17-member science committee roster. Representative Frank Lucas (OK) will be the top, or ranking, Republican on the panel, which for the past 6 years was led by then-Representative Lamar Smith (R–TX), who did not run for re-election in 2018.The committee’s open-door policy affords newcomers a forum to advance issues that don’t always attract national attention. For Casten, whose appointment to the Financial Services Committee hindered his chances of winning a leadership slot on the science committee, that means diving into the minutia of governance. His press release touting his new assignment lists six of his priorities, including restoring the congressional Office of Technology Assessment that Republicans abolished in 1995 and developing guidelines for the “responsible” use of “disruptive technologies such as CRISPR.”The new subcommittee chairs have yet to lay out their agendas, and some didn’t even send out a press release announcing their posts. But with the ability to hold hearings and invite witnesses, their time has arrived. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A major perk of being the majority party in the U.S. Congress is getting to fill the leadership slots on every committee. For several new Democratic legislators, however, having their party regain control of the House of Representatives also creates an unprecedented opportunity to shape U.S. science policy.On Wednesday, the newly configured House science committee will convene for the first time to adopt its rules and structure. To no one’s surprise, the 39-member committee will choose Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX) as its chairwoman.A 14-term legislator and former nurse administrator, Johnson has spent the past 6 years aggressively leading the Democratic charge against any number of Republican proposals seen as threats to the U.S. research enterprise. Now, her party will be setting the agenda. But her new lieutenants—the chairs of the panel’s five subcommittees—are rookies unschooled in the ways of Congress and, for the most part, in the challenges facing the community. Rookies lead the way on House science panellast_img read more

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White Students Dress Up For Schools Thug Day

first_imgBlack kids get kicked out of school for the day until they take out their braids or take off their durags or sometimes suspended. But suddenly when white kids do it it’s fine. Hmmm seems white. Cultural appropriation at its finest.— Brenna (@Brenna80964924) May 15, 2019Others said the students had a right to express themselves and that people were overreacting.“Look, I think it was an over-reaction by people,” said Todd Forbes, who graduated from Memorial High School in the early 1980’s, told the Houston Chronicle. “I think it might’ve been inappropriate, but the school over-reacted, too. And if that’s racist, then I must be missing something.” History has an unfunny way of repeating itself.Once again, white students have taken it upon themselves to use Black culture as “Dress Up Day” while also continuing to associate said culture with the highly racialized word “thug.” And it wasn’t the first time, according to current and former students at Memorial High School in Houston. On Monday, 11th-grade Memorial High students wore sports jerseys as part of a theme for what was reportedly dubbed “thug” day. A week of theme days to celebrate rising seniors has been a tradition at the school for several years. But some students have begun adding questionable accessories to their outfits that scream of racism. Several now viral photos popped up on social media showing white students wearing cornrows, fake tattoos, bandannas, gold chains, du-rags and more. In the pictures, some of them posed shamelessly holding up hand signs. Peanut video screenshot cultural appropriation Black Twitter Shakes Its Head As ‘Peanut’ Video Of Black Child Goes Viral Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. Heavy reported that this was not the first time students used the jersey-themed day for its so-called “Thug Day.” Time-stamped pictures go back to at least 2015 showing the same. Former students have also noted the past themes of “Swag Day” and “Senioritas Day” also caused tension at the school.Black students criticized the school for only releasing a statement this time around because they were getting national attention.“As a black student I am already not represented well at my school,” junior Laura Fields told the Huffington Post. “To see these events happen on Tuesday deeply offended and saddened me. I couldn’t grasp how the staff could let this happen again after years of the same thing.”Memorial High School released a statement regarding the pictures claiming that “Thug Day” was not authorized by school officials and deemed the students’ actions as “inappropriate.”“On Tuesday, some rising juniors wore inappropriate dress and body/hair decorations as part of an alternative, unapproved response to the theme day,” the statement read. “As a shared expectation about the theme was clearly violated, MHS has cancelled all remaining dress theme days for the remainder of this week. Students found to be in violation of the Student Code of Conduct and dress code will be given a consequence.”While the quote referenced rising juniors, it was actually juniors who were set to become seniors next school year.With the community being aware of apparent racism at the high school even before this incident, the Houston Chapter of the NAACP has called on the school to do more than just release a statement. READ MORE: Here We Go Again: Halloween Used As Excuse To Wear Racist Costumes“Memorial High School’s “thug” day for rising senior spirit week… yes this ACTUALLY happened TODAY at an actual high school but y’all keep saying “racism isnt a problem anymore”… right alright,” one Twitter user wrote. Memorial High School’s “thug” day for rising senior spirit week… yes this ACTUALLY happened TODAY at an actual high school but y’all keep saying “racism isnt a problem anymore”… right alright. pic.twitter.com/f3qHXR0B53— Rach (@Rachellemmma) May 14, 2019Another Twitter user wrote, “Black kids get kicked out of school for the day until they take out their braids or take off their durags or sometimes suspended. But suddenly when white kids do it it’s fine. Hmmm seems white. Cultural appropriation at its finest.” “They need to do more than make a statement,”  Houston NAACP President James Douglas said. “They need to have some training programs for these students to make them understand what it is like to live in a racial society. And why what they did was harmful to other people.”SEE ALSO:Maleah Davis’ Mother Is ‘Not Sure’ If There Was Abuse In The HomeFacebook Finally Suspends Pro-Hitler Candace Owens More By Megan Sims SUBSCRIBE Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversitylast_img read more

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Douglas starts candidate launch targeting UWP leader with photos

first_imgShareTweetSharePinIan DouglasThe parliamentary representative for the Portsmouth Constituency, Ian Douglas wasted no time in attacking the Leader of the Opposition United Workers Party (UWP) when he took to the podium in Grand Fond on Sunday.The Dominica Labour Party is currently launching Gretta Roberts, its candidate for the Morne Jaune/Riviere Cyrique Constituency.But before even speaking about anything relating to the achievements or expectations of Roberts, Douglas started with some serious allegations against the UWP.He accused them of being a party built on violence.“They were calling for electoral reform. When the DLP went to Parliament to begin the process they blockaded the House of Assembly, gathered stones…Even policemen were running for their lives,” he said.He told those gathered at Grand Fond that they cannot and should not even consider electing Linton or the UWP into office.“Lennox told you he is a bold face no face novice. Can you afford to put a man like that in the office of the prime minister? Can you allow UWP to get into office in Dominica?, Douglas asked, adding, “You have something that is working right now, something that’s good. Something that’s not broken. Why would you want to fix it?”.He also claimed that the UWP has a leadership that is the worst in Dominica’s political history.“They are the worst in any political party,” he said.After almost fifteen minutes of bashing the Opposition, Douglas finally turned his attention to the cause of the day-the launching of Roberts.He said all her life, she has been here serving the people of her community.“There is no choice in the matter. No debate in this constituency. No alternative to sister Gretta and when the poll closes whenever election is called. I want Grand Fond to be the first to be called,” he stated.Roberts is the daughter of Gertrude Roberts, the parliamentary representative for Morne Jaune/Riviere Cyrique from 1990 to 2000 under the United Workers’ Party.DLP supporters at Grand Fond for launch of Gretta Roberts Below are some more photos taken at the rain-affected event.last_img read more

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HHS art students

first_imgOctober 23, 2017 HHS art students RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adcenter_img Photo courtesy of Holbrook High SchoolThree Holbrook High School art students participated in the 2nd Annual Methodist Youth Ministries Native American Youth Art Show that was held on Oct. 7 at the Navajo County Fairgrounds. The students (left to right) Stacey Jackson, Jolene Ayze and Valtavia Cook were winners in the painting and drawing category. Stacey received Best in Show for her charcoal drawing of a cowboy, receiving a $100 gift certificate to Walmart. Jolene captured first place with her Warholesque self-portrait and garnered a $75 gift certificate. Rounding out the group was Valtavia who finished in second place for her collage and in third place for her Flower Notan piece and received $75 in gift certificates for her efforts.last_img read more

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Sheriffs deputies arrest suspect in theft ring

first_imgApril 2, 2019 Cody Muder       On Wednesday, March 27, Navajo County Sheriff’s deputies conducted a small-scale operation to attempt to locate possible leads or suspects in the areas east of Snowflake and south of Concho Highway. Deputies were followingSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adcenter_img Sheriff’s deputies arrest suspect in theft ringlast_img

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SC rules Rebel Karnataka MLAs cant be compelled to participate in trust

first_img Karnataka crisis LIVE updates: SC asks MLAs to appear before Speaker at 6 pm today A total of 16 Congress and JD(S) MLAs have submitted resignations since July 6. (PTI/File)The Supreme Court Wednesday left it to the Karnataka Assembly Speaker to decide on the resignations of the 15 rebel Congress and Janata Dal (S) MLAs but ordered that they should not be compelled to attend the proceedings of the state Assembly. The apex court’s order comes ahead of the floor test that is scheduled to take place in Karnataka Assembly tomorrow. In an interim order, a bench of Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi and Justices Deepak Gupta and Aniruddha Bose said it thought fit to permit the Speaker to decide on the resignations “within such time frame as the Speaker may consider appropriate”. The bench added that the MLAs should be given an option to attend or not to attend the proceedings of the House.Read | Karnataka crisis: The Speaker’s rulebook, explainedThe order came on petitions by the MLAs challenging the action of Karnataka Assembly Speaker K R Ramesh Kumar in not accepting their resignations. The bench said it was of the view that the Speaker should not feel fettered by any order and should be free to make a decision. The court directed that the Speaker’s decision be placed before it as and when it is taken. The bench, while pronouncing the order, said it was necessary to maintain the constitutional balance in the matter. The court said other issues raised in the matter would be decided at a later stage.Follow Karnataka crisis LIVE updatesA total of 16 Congress and JD(S) MLAs have submitted resignations since July 6. This means the coalition strength will fall to 101 compared to the BJP’s 105 plus two Independents in the 224-member House. If the resignations are accepted, the 13-month-old Congress-JD(S) government in Karnataka will lose the majority, paving the way for the BJP to stake claim to form the government.The rebels, few of whom have been camping in a hotel in Mumbai after resigning, had gone to the Supreme Court accusing the Speaker of not accepting their resignations in order to give the coalition more time to gather support.The top court had, on Tuesday, heard all the parties — Karnataka Speaker, rebel MLAs and Chief Minister Kumaraswamy. During the hearing, the court said that the position and powers of the Speaker after the enactment of the anti-defection law in 1985 may require a re-look. ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Written by Ananthakrishnan G | New Delhi | Updated: July 17, 2019 4:34:59 pm Salve hails verdict, says ICJ protected Jadhav from being executed Advertising Karnataka crisis: SC verdict a moral victory for rebel MLAs, says Yeddyurappa Related News center_img Advertising Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Best Of Express The CJI countered arguments that the court did not have the jurisdiction to direct the Speaker to act in a particular manner at this stage. “The extent of jurisdiction depends on the kind of restraint this court would like to impose upon itself. There is no inflexible rule,” the bench told senior counsel Abhishek Manu Singhvi who appeared for the Speaker.Opinion | Same old rent-seekingSenior Advocate Rajeev Dhavan, appearing for Kumaraswamy, said what mattered was the motive of the MLAs and the Speaker had to take this into account. “Your lordships are not dealing with individual resignations. But here is a situation where they are hunting in a pack,” he said, referring to the MLAs travelling to Mumbai after the political storm erupted.He said their petition did not disclose any fundamental right that warranted the filing of a writ petition under Article 32 of the Constitution.Senior advocate Mukul Rohatgi, representing the MLAs, said that “by not deciding, you (Speaker) are compelling a man to act against his wishes.”He contended that the resignation of the MLAs was voluntary and that it was absurd to demand proof when they had appeared in person and tendered their resignations. Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Express daily briefing: Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict out today; SC to rule on Karnataka MLAs’ plea; and more 54 Comment(s)last_img read more

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Gangster 3 who helped him escape killed UP cops

first_imgDeputy SP (Daurala) Jitendra Sargam, was injured in the exchange of fire. He was released from hospital after primary treatment, the police said. “They were in a car and when we asked them to stop, they sped away and we chased them. They were intercepted at the entry point of Sardhana-Daurala road. The criminals opened fire and we retaliated and both were killed on the spot,” said Meerut SSP Ajay Sahni.“The plan to get Sandu freed from police custody was prepared by Bhupendra Baafar, who wanted him (Sandu) fo the killing of another gangster, Sushil Moonch, who is lodged in Muzaffarnagar jail. We arrested Baafar from Muzaffarnagar on July 12,” said Muzaffarnagar SSP Abhisek Yadav. At the time of his arrest, two police guards were also present with him who were provided by the Meerut police for his security.BJP MLA from Sardhana, Sangeet Som, has demanded a high-level inquiry into how and why the Meerut police has provided two policemen for security of a “notorious gangster” who is facing seven cases of murder and several other cases in different police stations of UP and Uttarakhand.“The policemen were provided to Baafar as he expressed fear of being killed after Sushil Moonch surrendered himself in Muzaffarnagar in April. We will look into the issue,” said SSP Sahni. Uttar police, Uttar police encounter, Meerut police encounter, Muzaffarnagar police encounter, Rohit Sandu shot, Gangster Rohit Sandu, Gangster Rakesh Yadav, Indian express In Meerut, two members of the Sandu gang, Rajat alias Ravindra and Amit alias Sheru, were killed in an encounter on Sardhana-Daurala state highway Tuesday afternoon.THE MEERUT and Muzaffarnagar police killed four criminals in shootouts at separate places in both the districts since the early hours of Tuesday. Three policemen, including a Deputy SP, suffered injuries in the two incidents. By Express News Service |Meerut | Updated: July 17, 2019 4:05:25 am The Muzaffarnagar police Tuesday gunned down Rohit Sandu who was carrying a reward of Rs 1 lakh, and his aide, Rakesh Yadav (reward of Rs 50,000) in a shootout near Bilaspur village in Muzaffarnagar. Rohit was a resident of Johra village in Mansoorpur police station in the district while Yadav was a resident of Ayodhya. Two cops, Ajay Kumar and Vineet Kapasia, suffered injuries and were taken to hospital and released after primary treatment, the police said.Sandu had been freed from police custody when a police team escorting him was ambushed by six persons near Salarpur village in Muzaffarnagar on July 2. A sub-inspector, Durg Vijay Singh, who was shot at, died at a Delhi hospital on July 11. All the slain persons were involved in the attack on the police team on July 2, the police claimed.In Meerut, two members of the Sandu gang, Rajat alias Ravindra and Amit alias Sheru, were killed in an exchange of fire with the police on Sardhana-Daurala state highway Tuesday afternoon. They were also involved in the attack on the police team in Muzzafarnagar on July 2, the police claimed. Related News Advertising Advertising Cops: Two prisoners flee from UP jail; 1 run over by train Uttar Pradesh: Pratapgarh SP removed after VHP leader’s murder ‘Abduction, gangrape’ on Mainpuri Highway: Attempt to murder case against SO, 3 constables Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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New Facebook Project Aims to Strengthen Journalism

first_imgWho Benefits? Facebook on Tuesday unveiled the Journalism Project, which is designed to establish stronger ties with the journalism industry.Through the project, Facebook aims to bolster the quality of journalism on the network. Among other things, the project aims to tackle the fake news issue that flared during the U.S. presidential election and its aftermath.Among the steps on the Journalism Project’s road map:Collaborating with news organizations to develop products, including creating new story formats to better suit their needs, and creating new business models to help partners better distribute and monetize their content;Partnering with the Poynter Institute to launch a certificate curriculum for e-learning journalism courses and providing local newsroom training with various partners;Working with The First Draft Network to provide virtual certification for content;Providing free access to social media analytics on the CrowdTangle platform Facebook recently purchased;Letting Page admins designate specific journalists as contributors so they can go live on behalf of the page; Providing a live update feature for publishers; andContinuing efforts to curb fake news. The road map “is not directly related to fake news but is part of our ongoing efforts to work more collaboratively with our media partners,” Facebook said in a statement provided to TechNewsWorld by company representative Liz Allbright.”In the end we hope all of these efforts, together, will enable our community to have meaningful conversations, to be informed and to be connected to each other,” the company added. Facebook’s plans could benefit mainstream media, which struggled to provide election coverage amid accusations of bias and competition from fake news reports.”Approval of the mainstream media is around 6 percent — lower than that of Congress,” said Michael Jude, a program manager at Stratecast/Frost & Sullivan.”Journalism’s scrambling to find relevancy and legitimacy in this new online world,” he told TechNewsWorld.Fifty-eight percent of participants in a recent online survey said they trusted the websites they used to inform themselves. Thirty-two percent said Facebook was their main source of news.”Journalism as a craft has been significantly devalued by the last election, where major news sources dropped all pretense of objectivity in an effort to influence the election,” Jude maintained.”Rehabilitation depends on getting involved in efforts to provide objective news feeds that people can trust. In this sense, the Facebook efforts will help,” he added. Facebook’s efforts will “provide access to eyeballs” for its media partners, Jude said, which could lead to more effective monetization of their content and greater revenue. News as a Weapon of War Fake news can be leveraged as disinformation or propaganda, as well as to carry malware, said James Scott, senior fellow at the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology.While the Journalism Project may deter some fake news in the short term, “persistent adversaries will either develop more convincing fake news articles to propagate, or will develop methods to circumvent [the project’s] controls,” he told TechNewsWorld.Adversaries “can easily define the parameters the project uses to categorize fake news and develop lures within those parameters,” Scott explained. Further, the project “doesn’t stop malvertising on legitimate sites linked to Facebook.” Richard Adhikari has written about high-tech for leading industry publications since the 1990s and wonders where it’s all leading to. Will implanted RFID chips in humans be the Mark of the Beast? Will nanotech solve our coming food crisis? Does Sturgeon’s Law still hold true? You can connect with Richard on Google+.last_img read more

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Children have positive feelings when they lose their first baby tooth

first_img Source:https://www.media.uzh.ch/en/Press-Releases/2018/Baby_Tooth.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 24 2018Scared, ashamed, happy or proud – how do children feel when they lose their first baby tooth? An interdisciplinary research group at the University of Zurich has now found that children’s feelings are predominantly positive. The study also reveals that previous visits to the dentist’s as well as parental background and level of education affect how children experience the loss of their first tooth. Deciduous teeth, more commonly known as milk or baby teeth, are the first set of teeth that develop in children. These teeth usually fall out and are replaced by permanent teeth. Children generally lose their first baby tooth when they’re about six years old: The tooth comes loose and eventually falls out, leaving a gap which is then permanently filled by its replacement tooth. This gradual process is probably one of the first biological changes to their own bodies that children experience consciously. The emotions that accompany this milestone are extremely varied, ranging from joy at having finally joined the world of grown-ups to fear about the loss of a body part.Parents report positive reactionsAn interdisciplinary team of dental researchers and developmental and health psychologists at the University of Zurich, in cooperation with the City of Zurich’s School Dental Services, has now examined the feelings that children experience when they lose their first baby tooth, and which factors are at play. The scientists surveyed parents of children who had already lost at least one of their milk teeth. Of the nearly 1,300 responses received for the study, around 80 percent of parents reported positive feelings, while only 20 percent told of negative emotions. Raphael Patcas, first author of the study, is happy with the findings: “The fact that four out of five children experience the loss of a baby tooth as something positive is reassuring, for parents and dentists alike.”The longer it’s loose, the better the feelingsThe researchers found that previous visits to dentists played a role when it comes to children’s feelings. Children whose previous visits were cavity-related and thus perhaps associated with shame or guilt experienced fewer positive emotions when they later lost their first baby tooth. If, however, previous dental appointments were the result of an accident, and thus an abrupt, unexpected and painful event, then the loss of the first milk tooth was more likely to be associated with positive emotions. According to dental researcher Raphael Patcas, one possible explanation for this is that baby teeth loosen gradually before falling out – a process that, unlike an accident, unfolds slowly and predictably. This is also supported by the fact that children who experience the loosening of their tooth over an extended period of time tend to have more positive feelings: The longer the preparation and waiting time, the greater the relief and pride when the tooth finally falls out.Related StoriesPuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaParental education and background matterMoreover, the study also found that sociodemographic factors are related to children’s feelings: For example, children were more likely to have positive feelings such as pride or joy if the parents had a higher level of education and came from non-Western countries. The researchers indicate that cultural differences could be at play here: These include education style and norms that parents pass on to their children, as well as transitioning rituals that accompany the loss of the first baby tooth.”Our findings suggest that children deliberately process previous experiences concerning their teeth and integrate them in their emotional development,” says Moritz Daum, UZH professor of developmental psychology. This finding is important for dentists and parents alike: “Especially where cavities are concerned, it’s worth communicating with children prudently”, says Daum. “This way, emotions in connection with teeth and dentists can be put on the most positive trajectory possible.”last_img read more

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Pioneering clinical trials offers hope to restore damaged cells in Parkinsons disease

first_imgAccording to Steven Gill, MB, MS(Lond.), FRCS, lead neurosurgeon and designer of the CED device, of the Neurological and Musculoskeletal Sciences Division, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, and Renishaw plc, New Mills, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, UK, “This trial has shown that we can safely and repeatedly infuse drugs directly into patients’ brains over months or years. This is a significant breakthrough in our ability to treat neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s, because most drugs that might work cannot cross from the blood stream into the brain due to a natural protective barrier.””It’s essential to continue research exploring this treatment further – GDNF continues to hold potential to improve the lives of people with Parkinson’s,” commented Dr. Whone.I believe that this approach could be the first neuro-restorative treatment for people living with Parkinson’s, which is, of course, an extremely exciting prospect,” added Dr. Gill. Attending on an out-patient basis over 18 months, to receive infusions every four weeks via a skull-mounted port, is feasible. This treatment regimen and novel method of drug administration are well tolerated. Further testing of GDNF in a larger-scale study and including the use of higher doses are required to definitively determine whether GDNF has a future role as a neurorestorative treatment for Parkinson’s. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 26 2019A pioneering clinical trials program that delivered an experimental treatment directly to the brain offers hope that it may be possible to restore the cells damaged in Parkinson’s disease. The study investigated whether boosting the levels of a naturally-occurring growth factor, Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), can regenerate dying dopamine brain cells in patients with Parkinson’s and reverse their condition, something no existing treatment can do. Potentially promising results of the third arm of the trials, an open-label extension study, are reported in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease.The three-part multimillion-pound GDNF study was funded by Parkinson’s UK with support from The Cure Parkinson’s Trust and in association with the North Bristol NHS Trust.Six patients took part in the initial pilot study to assess the safety of the treatment approach. A further 35 individuals then participated in the nine-month double blind trial, in which half were randomly assigned to receive monthly infusions of GDNF and the other half placebo infusions. After the initial nine months on GDNF or placebo, the open-label extension study took place, which explored the effects and safety of continued exposure to GDNF for another 40 weeks in the patients previously receiving GDNF (80 weeks in total) and the effects of 40 weeks of open label GDNF in those subjects who had previously received placebo for the first 40 weeks. All 41 patients randomized and treated in the parent study (prior GDNF and placebo patients) were enrolled and completed the open label extension study.A specially designed delivery system was implanted using robot-assisted neurosurgery. This delivery system allowed high flow rate infusions to be administered every four weeks and enabled so called Convection Enhanced Delivery (CED) of the study drug. Four tubes were carefully placed into each patient’s brain, which allowed GDNF to be infused directly to the affected areas with pinpoint accuracy via a skull-mounted transcutaneous port behind the ear. After implantation and over the following several years the trial team administered, more than 1000 brain infusions, once every four weeks over 18 months to study participants. The high compliance rate (99.1%) in participants recruited from throughout the UK has potentially demonstrated that this new administration process for repeated brain infusion is clinically feasible and tolerable.After nine months, there was no change in the PET scans of those who received placebo, whereas the group who received GDNF showed an improvement of 100% in a key area of the brain affected in the condition, offering hope that the treatment was starting to reawaken and restore damaged brain cells.”The spatial and relative magnitude of the improvement in the brain scans is beyond anything seen previously in trials of surgically delivered growth-factor treatments for Parkinson’s,” explained principal investigator Alan L. Whone, PhD, FRCP, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, and Neurological and Musculoskeletal Sciences Division, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK. “This represents some of the most compelling evidence yet that we may have a means to possibly reawaken and restore the dopamine brain cells that are gradually destroyed in Parkinson’s.”Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingBy 18 months, when all participants had received GDNF, both groups showed moderate to large improvements in symptoms compared to before they started the study and that GDNF was safe when administered over this length of time. However, no significant differences between the groups (placebo followed by GDNF versus GDNF for the entire study period) in the primary and secondary clinical endpoints were seen.The question of whether clinical benefits lag behind biological changes seen in PET scans during disease reversal or need a longer period of repeated exposure to the drug to develop cannot be answered definitively on the basis of the extension study results. However, the integrated results of the two studies suggest that:center_img Source:https://www.iospress.nl/ios_news/new-treatment-offers-potentially-promising-results-for-the-possibility-of-slowing-stopping-or-even-reversing-parkinsons-disease/last_img read more

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Partnership aims at establishing best practices to promote diversity in clinical trials

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 22 2019Spencer Hoover, vice president and executive director of the Henry Ford Cancer Institute, is co-author of a manuscript published in the Journal of Oncology Practice aimed at establishing best practices to promote diversity in clinical trials. In-depth interviews were conducted with leaders from U.S. cancer centers with above average recruitment of racial and ethnic minority groups into clinical trials, with the goal of identifying specific strategies that were used to facilitate participation among racial and ethnic minorities.Participation of racial and ethnic minority groups in cancer trials is disproportionately low despite a high-prevalence of certain cancers among those populations. According to the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, approximately 10 percent of the minority population in the U.S. participates in clinical trials. At the Henry Ford Cancer Institute, more than 30 percent of cancer clinical trial participants represent a racial or ethnic minority group.Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancer”The importance of engaging racial and ethnic minority patients in clinical trials cannot be overstated,” said Hoover. “This population of patients has long been underrepresented in clinical trials, and it’s time we change that. Clinical trials for medications and medical devices must be representative of the diverse populations who will use them.”The manuscript indicates leadership, patient engagement, and community engagement practices as crucial factors to facilitate increased accrual of racial and ethnic minorities in cancer trials. In particular, high-recruiting centers such as Henry Ford Cancer Institute excelled in engaging with providers as the most important influencer of patient participation, engaging community leaders and building trust, and seeking dedicated input clinical research programs from racial and ethnic minority patients and caregivers to identify and overcome potential barriers as early as possible.”There are few cancer centers in the U.S. that are able to engage ethnic and racial minority patients in clinical trials as effectively as the Henry Ford Cancer Institute,” said Jeanne Regnante, senior vice president of Community Education at Sustainable Healthy Communities, LLC and lead author of the manuscript. “Our hope is that cancer centers throughout the country will benefit from the best practices identified in this publication. Leadership at the Henry Ford Cancer Institute is clearly laying the foundation of a paradigm-shift with precision medicine, especially in cancer.” Source:https://www.henryford.com/news/2019/03/collaboration-aims-to-reduce-racial-and-ethnic-disparities-in-clinical-trialslast_img read more

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ClinEpiDB releases data from MALED study that addresses childhood malnutrition

first_img Source:https://www.upenn.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 11 2019As the big data revolution continues to evolve, access to data that cut across many disciplines becomes increasingly valuable. In the field of public health, one barrier to sharing data is the need for users to fully comprehend complex methodological details and data variables in order to properly conduct analyses. The Clinical Epidemiology Database, ClinEpiDB.org aims to address these barriers by not only providing access to huge volumes of data, but also providing tools to help interpret complex global epidemiologic research studies. The development of ClinEpiDB has been led by a collaboration between the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Arts and Sciences, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Georgia’s Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Liverpool’s Institute of Integrative Biology.On March 7th ClinEpiDB released data, methodology, and documentation from “The Etiology, Risk Factors, and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development” (MAL-ED) study. The MAL-ED study represents a nearly decade-long research collaboration between the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), Fogarty International Center, and an international network of investigators. The MAL-ED study was designed to help identify environmental exposures early in a child’s life that are associated with shortfalls in physical growth, cognitive development, and immunity. The study characterizes gut function biomarkers on the causal pathway from environmental exposure to growth and development deficits and assesses diversity across geographic locations with respect to exposures and child health and development. The MAL-ED consortium has published a significant library of peer-reviewed publications and ClinEpiDB now makes the MAL-ED data highly visible and accessible in new and exciting ways.ClinEpiDB is also home to the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) which contains data from more than 22,000 children from seven sites in South Asia and Africa and was the largest-ever study to investigate the causes to moderate-to-severe diarrheal illness in children in lower- to middle-income countries. The most recent ClinEpiDB release also contains data from GEMS1A, a continuation of the GEMS study that broadened its scope to include less-severe diarrheal episodes. The addition of MAL-ED adds to the growing resource of high-quality maternal and child global health data.Related StoriesLiving in a warzone linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke, finds studyFoods enhanced with proven health benefits are stuck in ‘development limbo’, GM expert saysAnalyzing properties of texture-modified foods for people with dysphagia”Over 10 years, our international network of investigators collaborated through MAL-ED to better understand the complicated relationships among intestinal infections, nutrition and other environmental exposures on child development,” said Michael Gottlieb, Ph.D., FNIH Deputy Director of Science (retired) and lead Principal Investigator for the MAL-ED study. “The MAL-ED Network generated a high-quality data set, possibly the largest of its kind, on various research areas – from cognitive abilities to gut function to immunological response. We are pleased to make this dataset available through ClinEpiDB so it can be used by researchers far into the future to increase scientific understanding, test new research hypotheses, and design and implement better intervention strategies to reduce childhood morbidity and mortality.”MAL-ED sites (located in Iquitos, Peru; Fortaleza, Brazil; Haydom, Tanzania; Limpopo, South Africa; Bhaktapur, Nepal; Naushero Feroze, Pakistan; Vellore, India; Dhaka, Bangladesh) allowed for comparisons to be made among and between children living in geographically and culturally diverse urban and rural environments and in countries at different levels of economic development. MAL-ED data in ClinEpiDB account for over 1.3 million observations covering anthropometrics, nutrition, vaccination status, diarrheal and respiratory disease episodes and countless other details collected by community field workers in 2009-2014. The current release includes longitudinal data from children followed two times a week for the first 24 months of life. Future data releases will contain data for some children up to 5 years of age. ClinEpiDB allows users to walk through these data easily via an intuitive interface, enabling point-and-click filtering, simple queries and more complex “search strategies.” See https://youtu.be/535PcFrBH8M for a video introduction to this resource. ClinEpiDB will continue to grow and provide increased access to malaria and maternal and child health global datasets thus facilitating epidemiologic research in an open data environment while protecting patient identity.last_img read more

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Slowrelease HIV vaccine shows promise in preclinical trials

first_imgWhen faced with HIV, B cells produce antibodies that bind to the specific parts of the virus that trigger the infection. However, this is only successful for a short period of time, as the virus mutates and becomes undetectable to the immune cells once again.’A broadly neutralizing antibody for HIV’Shane Crotty, PhD, leader of this new study and a professor in the Division of Vaccine Discovery at LJI said the “vast majority” of antibodies bind to the wrong place on the HIV virus, rendering them “useless.”A separate paper published in Immunological Reviews in 2017 explained that advances in HIV vaccine research have “derived from the investigation of antibody responses in HIV-infected individuals using tools that have been designed to […] identify rare antigen-specific B cells from which [broadly neutralizing antibodies] can be generated”,But this new study begins by explaining that “Conventional immunization strategies will likely be insufficient for the development of a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) vaccine for HIV or other difficult pathogens because of the immunological hurdles posed, including B cell immunodominance and germinal center (GC) quantity and quality.”To combat this issue, Crotty and his research team compared three vaccine strategies to investigate whether certain dosage strategies would better neutralize antibody production.The study was carried out in collaboration with researchers at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, and rhesus monkeys were deemed the best animal model to study how the human immune system reacts to the HIV virus.The first strategy involved a traditional vaccine that was delivered in one dose. The second used an ‘osmotic pump’ strategy, which consisted of an implant that administered the full dose more slowly. The third strategy used an escalating dose, where the monkey models were administered partial doses every other day over the course of 12 days.‘A beautiful thing’Crotty described the immune response to the traditional vaccine as “lousy”, but the two slower release strategies resulted in higher quantities of antibodies that were also of better quality.“It was a beautiful thing to get to see what was happening in the lymph nodes over time,” Crotty said.“This paper demonstrates the power of the approach,” he added, as the paper demonstrates that it may not be the vaccine itself that needs to be changed to improve its efficacy. Sources:Moir, S. & Fauci, A. S. (2017). B cell responses to HIV infection. Immunol Rev. doi.org/10.1111%2Fimr.12502.Cirelli, K. M., et al. (2019). Slow Delivery Immunization Enhances HIV Neutralizing Antibody and Germinal Center Responses via Modulation of Immunodominance. Cell. doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2019.04.012. By Lois Zoppi, BAMay 10 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)A new slow-release vaccine has been shown to boost the immune system’s response to the HIV virus. Scientists discovered that administering an HIV vaccine in small doses over a period of days resulted in stronger immune responses compared to a single dose of the vaccine.Marko Aliaksandr | ShutterstockThe study was published in Cell in May 2019 and focuses on targeting the way in which immune cells work together to eliminate pathogens.B cells are a type of white blood cell that produces antibodies in the bone marrow. During development, these cells move to areas of the lymph nodes called germinal centers. B cells that produce the antibodies capable of binding to the HIV pathogen are selected by T follicular helper (TFH) cells, and the strongest B cells then continue on to go through further mutations, testing, and the antibodies they produce are refined. It’s like physical training – you start off weak and then keep going back to the gym to get stronger. The germinal center is the gym and the B cells have to repeatedly go back to undergo rounds of selection to get better binding.”Kimberly Cirelli, First Authorcenter_img Practical methods for clinical delivery of the HIV vaccine using this slow-release strategy is the next step necessary in advancing this intriguing research.Cirelli, who is also a member of the Scripps Research’s Center for HIV/AIDs Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery (Scripps CHAVI-ID), said that they may need to “think more outside the box to develop vaccines against harder-to-neutralize pathogens, including HIV.”A possible route could be to contain the vaccine in degradable capsules that will be easier for patients to take than multiple doses or using osmotic pumps. If you change the way the immune system sees viral proteins, it really can make a dramatic difference.”last_img read more

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German nationalist wins injunction against Facebook

Explore further German court fines Facebook over site’s terms of service © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: German nationalist wins injunction against Facebook (2018, April 30) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-german-nationalist-injunction-facebook.html In a post, a user had called Alice Weidel, co-leader of the Alternative for Germany party, a “dirty Nazi swine” for reportedly opposing same-sex marriage.While Facebook hid the post from German users, Weidel’s lawyers argued it could be easily viewed in Germany by using a VPN service that routes Internet traffic through computers in another country.A spokesman for Hamburg’s regional court, Kai Wantzen, said Monday that Facebook faces a fine of 250,000 euros ($301,750) if it fails to comply with the injunction.Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.Weidel has previously accused the German government of seeking to censor online speech. A leading German nationalist politician has won a court injunction forcing Facebook to ensure a user’s slur against her can’t be seen in Germany. read more

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Australia telecom giant Telstra flags tough times as profit slides

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP Australia’s dominant telecommunications company Telstra Thursday warned of “enormous challenges” ahead as it posted an 8.9 percent slump in annual profit. Australia telecom giant Telstra to axe 8,000 jobs Explore furthercenter_img Australia’s dominant telecommunications company Telstra Thursday warned of “enormous challenges” ahead as it posted an 8.9 percent slump in annual profit Citation: Australia telecom giant Telstra flags tough times as profit slides (2018, August 16) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-australia-telecom-giant-telstra-flags.html Its net result in the year to June 30 fell to Aus$3.52 billion (US$2.54 billion), while revenue was flat at Aus$26 billion.Chief executive Andy Penn said intense competition for mobile customers and increased customer expectations were having an impact on business.”Companies are defined by how they respond in challenging times and there is no doubt Telstra, and the telecommunications industry globally, is operating in times of enormous challenge and change,” he said. “On one hand demand for our core products and services continues to grow. Telecommunications networks have become some of the most important pieces of infrastructure in the world today. “On the other hand, competition has never been more intense, our market dynamics are shifting rapidly, and customer expectations are changing.”He pointed to the accelerated rollout of a national broadband network, in particular, as weighing on the company.”This is having an enormous impact on our business—wholesale prices have risen, meaning we and other industry participants are facing a fixed-line market where reseller margins are rapidly reducing,” he said. “At the same time, competition in the mobile market is increasing with the expected entrance of a fourth mobile network operator. These factors have influenced our performance this year.”In a bid to transform the business to deal with the new realities, Telstra, one of Australia’s largest employers, has put in place a new strategy to be achieved by 2022.This includes a plan announced in June to axe 8,000 jobs—a quarter of its workforce—in a bid to achieve an extra Aus$1 billion in cost-cutting, on top of Aus$1.5 billion previously announced.It will also split its mobile and infrastructure divisions into separate businesses.”We are determined to meet the challenges we face, and to continue to lead in the market, just as we have always done,” said Penn.Telstra said it will pay a six-monthly dividend of 11 cents for a full-year payout of 22 cents.last_img read more

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FAA chief defends handling of Boeing Max safety approval

first_imgUnder questioning, Elwell said Boeing should not have waited more than a year to tell FAA and airlines that another feature—a light that indicates when information from flight sensors might be unreliable—did not work.Elwell said the light was not critical for safety—Boeing has said the same thing—although some lawmakers seemed skeptical.The Dallas Morning News reported that American Airlines pilots pressed Boeing in November—shortly after the first Max crash—on potentially grounding the planes and pushed for a quick software fix from the plane maker.”We don’t want to do a crappy job of fixing things, and we also don’t want to fix the wrong things,” a Boeing employee responded, according to a recording reviewed by the newspaper.Elwell was joined at the House hearing by Robert Sumwalt, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board. No Boeing representatives were invited to testify. Elwell defended the FAA’s 2017 approval of the Max including its new automated flight-control system that can push the nose of the plane down if a single sensor detects that the plane could be nearing an aerodynamic stall.That system, called MCAS, was triggered on both fatal flights by faulty sensor readings, and pilots were not able to regain control of the planes as they plunged to Earth. Airlines and pilots were not told about MCAS until after the October crash.”When I first heard of this, (I) thought that the MCAS should have been more adequately explained in the ops manual and the flight manual,” Elwell said.He said he expects more explanation to accompany Boeing’s fix for the plane, “to make pilots more aware and respond better to an anomaly.”Boeing is now reducing the power of MCAS to tilt the plane down, and linking the system to two sensors instead of one. Michael Stumo and Nadia Milleron, right, parents of Samya Stumo, 24, a Massachusetts resident who died in the Ethiopian plane crash, listen during a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) Daniel Elwell, acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, left, shakes hands with Robert L. Sumwalt, right, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, as the arrive to testify before a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) Dickson said he would not hesitate to take enforcement action against a company regulated by the FAA.U.S. aviation has an enviable safety record over the past decade, Dickson said, but the industry is only as good as the last takeoff or landing. Michael Stumo, right, the father of Samya Stumo, 24, a Massachusetts resident who died in the Ethiopian plane crash, shows a photo of his daughter and others who died in the crash to Daniel Elwell, left, acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, before the start of a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., struck a sharper tone, criticizing Boeing for pilot manuals that didn’t mention a new automated flight-control system implicated in both accidents. © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Citation: FAA chief defends handling of Boeing Max safety approval (2019, May 15) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-faa-chief-defends-boeing-max.html FAA deferred to Boeing on key 737 MAX assessments: source Daniel Elwell, acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, testifies during a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) “It bothers me that we continue to tear down our system based on what has happened in two other countries,” said Rep. Sam Graves, R-Mo.Across Capitol Hill, a Senate committee held a confirmation hearing for President Donald Trump’s choice to lead the FAA, former Delta Air Lines pilot and executive Stephen Dickson. He promised senators that he would make sure the FAA does not become captive to the industry it regulates.House Aviation subcommittee Chairman Rick Larsen opened the hearing by declaring that, “The FAA has a credibility problem.”Larsen, however, added a note of economic urgency to the FAA’s upcoming decision on the plane’s safety. The 737 Max is Boeing’s best-selling plane and it is built in his home state of Washington.Larsen said Congress must help make the public feel safe about flying because “if they don’t fly, airlines don’t need to buy airplanes,” and “then there will be no jobs” in aircraft manufacturing. DeFazio, who heads the full Transportation Committee, also said he and Larsen have been frustrated after requesting documents from Boeing to aid in the panel’s investigation.”Boeing has yet to provide a single document,” he said. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of this.”Boeing is already the subject of a criminal investigation by the Justice Department. Boeing customers Southwest Airlines and American Airlines and their pilot unions have received subpoenas related to that investigation; United Airlines, which also flew the Max until it was grounded in March, declined to comment, although its pilot union confirmed that it too has received a subpoena.The Transportation Department’s inspector general and two congressional committees are looking into the FAA’s relationship with Boeing. The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday that Boeing should have done more to explain an automated flight-control system on its 737 Max aircraft before two deadly crashes, but he defended his agency’s safety certification of the plane and its decision not to ground the jet until other regulators around the world had already done so. The FAA official, Daniel Elwell, said he expects Boeing to submit a fix to the plane’s flight-control software “in the next week or so.” The FAA will analyze the changes, conduct test flights and determine what additional pilot training is needed before letting the planes fly again, he said.”In the U.S., the 737 Max will return to service only when the FAA’s analysis of the facts and technical data indicate that it is safe to do so,” he told members of the House aviation subcommittee.During a two-hour hearing, lawmakers pressed Elwell on the FAA’s reliance on designated Boeing employees during the planes’ certification process and why the agency didn’t ground the planes sooner.Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., told Elwell that the public believes “you were in bed with those you were supposed to be regulating, and that’s why it took so long” to ground the planes.Other lawmakers defended Boeing and suggested that the Oct. 29 crash of a Lion Air jet off Indonesia and the March 10 crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Max were due at least partly to pilot error. A total of 346 people were killed in the crashes. Robert L. Sumwalt, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, testifies during a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) Explore further Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., speaks during a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) House Transportation Subcommittee Chairman Rep. Rick Larsen, D-W.Va., speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft.(AP Photo/Susan Walsh) Nadia Milleron, whose daughter, Samya Stumo, was on the Ethiopian Airlines plane, was in the audience. She said FAA seems to be rushing to approve Boeing’s fixes to the Max.Regulators, she said, should wait until the accident investigations are finished—something that could take many months. “It is possible that these planes should never go back in the air,” she added.Milleron, whose family is suing Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines, said travelers hold the final power to ground the plane.”The only thing that is going to stop this is the public,” Milleron said in an interview. “If the public is concerned and if the Boeing 737 Max 8 … becomes toxic … that’s going to make a change.”The Senate Commerce Committee heard from Dickson, the former Delta official who, if confirmed by the full Senate, would replace Elwell. The FAA has been led by an acting administrator since January 2018. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Has the Earth Ever Been This Hot Before

first_img What is a Carbon Sink? Earth’s climate does naturally oscillate — over tens of thousands of years, its rotations around the sun slowly change, leading to variations in everything from seasons to sunlight. Partially as a result of these oscillations, Earth goes through glacial periods (better known as ice ages) and warmer interglacial periods. But to create a massive warming event, like the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum, it takes more than a change in the tilt of Earth’s axis, or the shape of its path around the sun. Extreme warming events always involve the same invisible culprit, one we’re all too familiar with today: a massive dose of carbon dioxide, or CO2. This greenhouse gas was almost certainly responsible for the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum. But how did CO2 concentrations get so high without humans around? Scientists aren’t absolutely sure, said Sébastien Castelltort, a geologist at the University of Geneva. Their best guess is that volcanoes spewed carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, trapping heat, and perhaps melting frozen pockets of methane, a greenhouse gas more potent than CO2 that had been long sequestered under the ocean. Just because extreme warming events spurred by greenhouse gases have happened before, doesn’t mean these events are harmless. Take, for instance, the Permian-Triassic extinction event, which struck a few million years before dinosaurs arose on the planet. If the word “extinction” isn’t enough of a clue, here’s a spoiler: it was an absolute disaster for Earth and everything on it. This warming event, which occurred 252 million years ago, was so extreme that Sutherland calls it the “poster child for the runaway greenhouse effect.” This warming event, which was also caused by volcanic activity (in this case, the eruption of a volcanic region called the Siberian Traps), triggered climate chaos and widespread death. “Imagine extreme drought, plants dying, the Saharah spreading throughout the continent,” Sutherland told Live Science. Temperatures rose 18 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius). (This is compared with the 2.1 F (1.2 C) rise in temperature we’ve seen since humans began burning fossil fuels). Around 95% of marine life and 70% of terrestrial life went extinct. “It was just too hot and unpleasant for creatures to live,” Sutherland said. It’s uncertain how high greenhouse gas concentrations were during the Permian-Triassic extinction event, but they likely were far higher than they are today. Some models suggest they grew as high as 3,500 parts per million (ppm). (For perspective, today’s carbon dioxide concentrations hover a little over 400 ppm — but that’s still considered high). But it’s the rate of change in CO2 concentrations that makes today’s situation so unprecedented. During the Permian Triassic extinction event, it took thousands of years for temperatures to rise as high as they did — according to some studies, as many as 150,000 years. During the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum, considered an extremely rapid case of warming, temperatures took 10,000 to 20,000 years to reach their height. Today’s warming has taken only 150 years. That is the biggest difference between today’s climate change and past climatic highs. It’s also what makes the consequences of current climate change so difficult to predict, Castelltort said. The concern isn’t just “but the planet is warming.” The concern is that we don’t know how rapid is too rapid for life to adjust, he said. Based on past warming events, no experts could possibly say that the current rate of warming won’t have dramatic consequences, he said. “We just don’t know how dramatic,” he added. Originally published on Live Science. What If a Giant Asteroid Had Not Wiped Out the Dinosaurs?center_img Why Weather Affects Climate Change Belief Would you ever go on vacation to the North Pole? Unless you like subzero temperatures and Nordic-ski treks, probably not. But if you lived 56 million years ago, you might answer differently. Back then, you would have enjoyed balmy temperatures and a lush green landscape (although you would have had to watch out for crocodiles). That’s because the world was in the middle of an extreme period of global warming called the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum, when the Earth was so hot that even the poles reached nearly tropical temperatures. But was the planet ever as hot as it is today, when every month the globe seems to be breaking one high-temperature record after another? It turns out that the Earth has gone through periods of extreme warming more than once. The poles have frozen and thawed and frozen again. Now, the Earth is heating up again. Even so, today’s climate change is a different beast, and it’s clearly not just part of some larger natural cycle, Stuart Sutherland, a paleontologist at the University of British Columbia, told Live Science. [How Often Do Ice Ages Happen?]  Advertisementlast_img read more

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What Are GMOs and GM Foods

first_img This article was updated on July 8, 2019 by Live Science Contributor Mark Davis. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndoAmOne.comHere’s How to Refinance $10,000 FastAmOne.comUndoYahoo SearchYou’ve Never Seen Luxury Like This On A Cruise Ship. Search Luxury Mediterranean CruisesYahoo SearchUndo Why GMOs are good Many scientific organizations and industry groups agree that the fear-mongering that runs through discussions of GMO foods is more emotional than factual. “Indeed, the science is quite clear: crop improvement by the modern molecular techniques of biotechnology is safe,” the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) said in a 2012 statement. “The World Health Organization, the American Medical Association, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the British Royal Society, and every other respected organization that has examined the evidence has come to the same conclusion: Consuming foods containing ingredients derived from GM (genetically modified) crops is no riskier than consuming the same foods containing ingredients from crop plants modified by conventional plant improvement techniques,” according to the AAAS. Others point to the benefits of sturdier crops with higher yields. “GM crops can improve yields for farmers, reduce draws on natural resources and fossil fuels and provide nutritional benefits,” according to a statement on the website for Monsanto, the world’s largest manufacturer of GMOs. Monsanto and other agriculture companies have a financial stake in the research and messaging surrounding GM foods and have the resources to fund research that reinforces their narrative. However, although there are plenty of scientific data that demonstrates the safety, efficacy and resilience of GM crops, genetic modification remains a comparatively new scientific field. GMO labeling debate The argument over the development and marketing of GMO foods has become a political hot potato in recent years. In November 2015, the FDA issued a ruling that only requires additional labeling of foods derived from genetically engineered sources if there is a material difference — such as a different nutritional profile — between the GMO product and its non-GMO equivalent. The agency also approved AquaAdvantage Salmon, a salmon designed to grow faster than non-GMO salmon. According to Monsanto, “there is no scientific justification for special labeling of foods that contain GM ingredients. We support these positions and the FDA’s approach.” According to GMO Answers, an industry group comprised of Monsanto, DuPont, Dow AgroSciences, Bayer, BASF, CropScience and Syngenta, GMO agricultural products are “by far the most regulated and tested product in agricultural history.” Additionally, their website states that “many independent scientists and organizations around the world — such as the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, World Health Organization, American Medical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science — have looked at thousands of scientific studies and concluded that GM food crops do not pose more risks to people, animals or the environment than any other foods.” The political issue that GMOs have become is almost as conductive as the scientific debate. However, after much discussion among various lawmakers across the U.S., the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS) was passed into law at the beginning of 2019. According to the NBFDS current federal statutes, starting in 2020, all food must bear a BE (bioengineered) label if it contains more than 5% bioengineered material. States are free to impose their own labeling requirements as well, though it seems that most jurisdictions are waiting for federal laws to be implemented before working on new legislation. One thing is for certain: the scientific and political discussions surrounding GMO foods aren’t going away any time soon. Additional resources: Read the WHO’s answers to frequently asked questions about GMOs. Learn more about the genetics behind GM foods, from the University of Utah.center_img A genetically modified organism, or GMO, is an organism that has had its DNA altered or modified in some way through genetic engineering. In most cases, GMOs have been altered with DNA from another organism, be it a bacterium, plant, virus or animal; these organisms are sometimes referred to as “transgenic” organisms. Genetics from a spider that helps the arachnid produce silk, for example, could be inserted into the DNA of an ordinary goat. It sounds far-fetched, but that is the exact process used to breed goats that produce silk proteins in their goat milk, Science Nation reported. Their milk is then harvested, and the silk protein is then isolated to make a lightweight, ultrastrong silk material with a wide range of industrial and medical uses.Advertisement The dizzying range of GMO categories is enough to boggle the mind. CRISPR, a novel genome editing tool, has allowed geneticists to breed GMO pigs that glow in the dark by inserting jellyfish bioluminescence genetic code into pig DNA. CRISPR is opening doors to genetic modifications the likes of which were unimaginable just a decade ago. These are more comparatively wild examples, but GMOs are already very common in the farming industry. The most common genetic modifications are designed to create higher yield crops, more consistent products, and resist pests, pesticides and fertilizer. Genetically modified food According to the National Library of Medicine (part of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, or NCBI), genetically engineered, or GM, foods are those that have had foreign genes from other plants or animals inserted into their genetic codes. This has resulted in foods that are consistently flavored, as well as resistant to disease and drought. However, the NCBI also maintains a list of potential risks associated with GM foods, including genetic alterations that can cause environmental harm. Specifically, it’s possible that modified organisms could be inbred with natural organisms, leading to the possible extinction of the original organism. For instance, the banana tree is propagated entirely through cloning methods. The bananas themselves are sterile. By far, the biggest use of GMO technology is in large-scale agricultural crops. At least 90% of the soy, cotton, canola, corn and sugar beets sold in the United States have been genetically engineered. The adoption of herbicide-resistant corn, which had been slower in previous years, has accelerated, reaching 89% of U.S. corn acreage in 2014 and 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. One of the biggest draws for widespread adoption of GMO crops is pest resistance. According to the World Health Organization, one of the most widely used methods for incorporating pest resistance into plants is through Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genetics, a bacterium that produces proteins that repel insects. GMO crops that are modified with the Bt gene have a proven resistance to insect pests, thus reducing the need for wide-scale spraying of synthetic pesticides. Are GMOs safe? Anti-GMO activists argue that GMOs can cause environmental damage and health problems for consumers. One such anti-GMO organization is the Center for Food Safety, which calls the genetic engineering of plants and animals potentially “one of the greatest and most intractable environmental challenges of the 21st century.” “Genetically modified foods have been linked to toxic and allergic reactions, sickness, sterile and dead livestock, and damage to virtually every organ studied in lab animals,” according to the Institute for Responsible Technology, a group of anti-GMO activists. “Most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe,” according to the Non-GMO Project. “In more than 60 countries around the world, including Australia, Japan and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs.” As You Sow is a nonprofit environmental watchdog focusing its research on how corporate actions affect our environment, including food production. According to Christy Spees, a program manager with As You Sow, GMO foods are dangerous “because the modifications are centered around resistance to toxic substances, such as pesticides and certain fertilizers. When dangerous chemicals are applied, plants use them to grow, and the food itself can be detrimental to our health.” Designer Plants Boost Crop Yields | VideoVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/40895-gmo-facts.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:0301:03Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭  See how Americans are narrowly divided on their thoughts about GMO safety according to a recent Pew Research Center report.last_img read more

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