TMobile ONE plan limits Apple Watch Series 3 to slow data speeds

first_imgREAD: Apple Watch Series 3 with LTE hands-onThe limitation is part of the T-Mobile ONE Plan, and it is an unfortunate restriction given the nature of the Apple Watch — it won’t use up a ton of data no matter how you use it, with the greatest data burden likely being streaming music. Going with an unlimited plan through one of the other major carriers won’t bring the same low speeds.However, T-Mobile isn’t entirely leaving its subscribers without options; it is simply pushing them toward its High Speed Data with paired DIGITS plan. The carrier confirmed to MacRumors that it will give Apple Watch users on this plan access to full 4G LTE speeds. Of note, the DIGITS part of that plan costs $25/month.That extra cost is higher than the $10/month other major carriers charge to have the wearable tacked onto the subscriber’s plan. Overall, it’s a bizarre restriction and it is hard to see how T-Mobile benefits from it — after all, switching from T-Mobile to one of the other carriers is a simple matter for many consumers.SOURCE: MacRumors T-Mobile users who have their hearts set on the new Apple Series 3 with LTE are facing some unfortunate news: the carrier is limiting the wearable to 3G-ish speeds. The carrier doesn’t go out of its way to underscore that reality, instead listing it among various tidbits of fine print. According to that fine print, you’ll get 512Kbps speeds with your shiny new Apple wearable.last_img read more

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Nokia 7 Plus details leaked in photos

first_imgIt isn’t certain when HMD plans on bringing out this Nokia 7 Plus, which might be too soon considering the Nokia 7 only broke cover less than four months ago. Still, with MWC 2018 just a few weeks away, we could very well catch a glimpse of it before its launch.VIA: Nokiapoweruser We’ve heard most of these details before. But it’s one thing hearing them from leaksters and another seeing them in allegedly final PR slides. Of course, the veracity of these images are still a bit questionable, but they at least look more legit than a simple list.As leaked before, the Nokia 7 Plus upgrades the processor from a Snapdragon 630 to a 660. The screen has also been enlarged, now 6 inches, with an 18:9 aspect ratio, most probably 2160×1080 FHD+. Sadly, the memory options haven’t seen a change at 4 GB RAM and 64 GB storage. No word on a 6 GB RAM option yet.Perhaps the biggest upgrades on the Nokia 7 Plus are its cameras. On the back, you get a dual camera setup with 12 and 13 megapixel sensors, capable of 2x zoom. The front camera gets a 16 megapixel “Tetracell” sensor. Both, naturally, use Zeiss lenses. HMD Global’s and Nokia’s Android smartphone strategy is, to be frank, all over the place. There doesn’t seem to be a discernible rhyme and reason to its models just yet. It just launched the Nokia 6 2018 edition but there isn’t going to be a 2018 edition for the Nokia 7, at least not yet. Instead, there will be a Nokia 7 Plus, and it’s looking to be quite a curious mid-range phone, at least based on these leaked marketing materials.last_img read more

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Google 911 tech could help US EMS find cell phone callers

first_imgThe information comes from The Wall Street Journal, which reports that Google tested the new technology with some 911 operators in the US. The results are described as having been “promising,” indicating the nation’s 911 system may get a much needed tech boost.The test was performed in December and January, according to the report, and it involved multiple 911 operators in multiple states. The technology in question was able to send location information from a caller’s Android smartphone to the emergency call centers, giving them a fairly accurate piece of location information.Both RapidSOS and West Corp, a pair of companies that work with 911 centers, were involved in the test. Of the 911 calls that included phone location information, more than 80-percent of them were more accurate than the location data provided by the wireless carrier in the first half-minute of the call, at least according to RapidSOS.AdChoices广告While on average the carrier’s data could get the location accurate to within about 500ft, Google’s location data was accurate to around 100ft; the info from Google also arrived faster than from carriers, shaving precious seconds off the process that could help save lives. The tech may be launched across a wider area later on this year.SOURCE: Wall Street Journal Cell phones, as great as they are, have made things difficult for the US’s emergency operators. It’s difficult to pinpoint the location of a cell phone caller who isn’t able to give their location, a problem Google may be working to solve. According to a recent report, the Internet giant recently tested tech that helps 911 centers identify the location of a cell phone caller.last_img read more

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Nokia 61 will be available in the US starting May 6

first_imgThe anticipated Nokia 6.1 will be available to purchase in the United States starting next week, HMD has announced. The handset will be available through the online retailer Amazon and through Best Buy. This model brings more power than its predecessor, as well as a beautiful aluminum design, Android Oreo out of the box, and much more. The Nokia 6.1 will be available to purchase from the aforementioned retailers starting this weekend on May 6 for $269 USD. This model features a Qualcomm Snapdragon 630 Mobile Platform, offering 60-percent faster speeds than the previous model. As well, the 6.1 has a more compact body sporting an aluminum shell.HMD describes the process behind the finished product, saying that 11 hours are spent two-tone anodizing and then polishing the 6000 series aluminum from which the phone’s chassis is made. The handset features a 5.5-inch Full HD IPS 2.5D sculpted display with Gorilla Glass. The Nokia 6.1 also features Dual-Sight, the maker’s “bothie” feature that enables the front and rear camera to be used at the same time. The camera itself features ZEISS optics, plus there’s spatial audio and USB-C fast charging.According to HMD, the Nokia 6.1’s 3000mAh battery can be charged to 50-percent in 30 minutes, that of course being possible due to the USB-C support. The spatial audio feature mentioned above enables users to record hi-fi surround sound for their videos, creating a more immersive experience. Rounding it all out is the ability to unlock the phone using one’s face.Finally, the Nokia 6.1 is an Android One handset; it runs pure Android, eliminating the things users may not like about other handsets, including custom UI elements. HMD says the handset features “a limited number” of preloaded apps.last_img read more

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Elago Wrist Fit makes sure you wont lose your AirPods

first_imgOne of the biggest concerns people had about the AirPods when they were first revealed was how they could be easily lost or drop off your ear. The latter has so far been debunked but some still worry about misplacing their pair when they’re not in their ears nor in their charging pod. Accessory maker Elago is proposing a solution, one that will be as inconspicuous as possible. That is until someone glances at your wrist. Admittedly, the Elago Wrist Fit might clash with the aesthetic tastes of some users. It does seem to be more like an interim place to store your AirPods while you’re out for a run and have no place to store the charging case. Some might decide, however, that they would look less odd with the AirPods dangling from their ears than from their wrists. Elago calls it the Wrist Fit and if it reminds you of a Fitbit or similar, then you’re not exactly that far off. Wrist Fit is basically just a silicone-like piece where you stick your AirPods into. It’s promised never to loosen up so your AirPods won’t suddenly slip off over time.The “holder” itself slips into a bad. The Wrist Fit does come with its own, nondescript black band that seems to be designed with active lifestyle users in mind. It can, however, also slip into an Apple watch band, presuming it doesn’t clash with the color or style.center_img AdChoices广告last_img read more

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Galaxy Note 9 price leaks show reasonable claim

first_imgThe Samsung Galaxy Note 9 will be revealed at an event on August 9th, 2018, with a price that’s supposed to be “reasonable.” Today we’re going to run down some clues and reasons why that might not be true. Samsung’s claim comes in the form of a quote during their quarterly earnings call this week, tipping off the Galaxy Note for one, certain, final time. Samsung’s earnings call was mostly run as expected – save a couple of key quotes. The company suggested that they’d be ramping up efforts to bring profit back to the company. And note: it’s not that they were doing bad, really, just that they weren’t growing at the rate they’d hoped. Official Galaxy Note 9 accessories leaked and pricedThe key quote of the day was as follows. “Samsung will seek to expand sales by introducing a new Galaxy Note earlier than usual, which offers exceptional performance for a reasonable price.” Note the “earlier than usual” bit first. The Galaxy Note 8 was revealed at a late August event last year – during IFA 2017. Here in 2018, the Galaxy Note 9 is set to roll several weeks earlier.The Galaxy Note 9 is supposed to deliver “exceptional performance for a reasonable price.” Which could mean a lot of things. In this case, based on what we’ve seen in leaks and insider (anonymous) tips, this means the price will stay largely in-line with what the Galaxy Note 8 cost at launch. Of course that device had different iterations at launch, so there’s some considerations to be made as well.At least one version of the phone won’t be available inside the United States – the most impressively feature-packed version. That’ll be the version with 512GB internal storage. It’s probably for the best, since it’s rumored that this version will cost around a whopping $1,250 USD.The good news is that the basic price of the Galaxy Note 9 for the smallest internal storage is probably closer to $950, right on-par with the most basic model offered in 2017. Everything after that’s probably up at or over $1,000 USD!Have a peek at the timeline below for additional bits and pieces of this ever-more-complete puzzle that’ll be shown in full on August 9th, 2018. We’re expecting pre-orders to be launched within a week after that, then a full release on or around the 24th of August, 2018. Story TimelineGalaxy Note 9 release level dummy in-hand size analysisOfficial Galaxy Note 9 accessories priced (and leaked)Galaxy Note 9 pre-pre-orders open before release dateGalaxy Note 9 hands-on leak shows almost all the sideslast_img read more

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Palms tiny Android phone coming to Verizon next week

Story TimelineVerizon’s Palm “Pepito” smartphone leaks, and it’s a tiny Android oddityPalm PVG100 leak shows a puzzling comebackPalm made a beautiful, ridiculous mistake of a new phone Let’s get the specs out of the way. The Palm, which doesn’t have any qualifier attached to its name, is pretty much an entry-level budget Android 8.1 phone running on a Snapdragon 435. The 3 GB of RAM and 32 GB of storage, however, isn’t exactly your standard fare low-tier configuration. And the 3.3-inch 720p screen means you actually have a higher pixel density than many smartphones these days. The 12 megapixel rear camera and 8 megapixel selfie camera might not be all that, but they’re still there, surprising for a phone this size.So what is the Palm for anyway? It’s meant to be an extension of your main smartphone much like your smartwatch. Unlike a smartwatch, however, you have a full, though tiny, Android phone, with all the apps you can possibly cram and use on it. And unlike some smartwatches, you can use the Palm and leave your “real” phone at home without worrying about missed calls or messages.That’s thanks to its exclusive partnership with Verizon. In particular, Verizon’s NumberShare subscription syncs the phone number and messages so that the Palm is pretty much a stunt double of your real phone. One that can fit easily in small wristlet bags, straps, etc. And when you do have your phone with you or just don’t want to be disturbed on your Palm, the Life Mode feature will turn off all the radios (Wi-Fi, cellular, Bluetooth) when you lock the screen. Unless you’re on a phone call, of course, or streaming music, or tracking your location.The Palm will be available on Verizon starting November 2 for $14.58 per month for 24 months or $299.99 with a new two-year contract or just $349.99 in full. Available colors are Titanium and Gold. Verizon’s NumberShare isn’t free, though, and costs an additional $10 per month per line. Palm’s comeback is almost a joke but it’s dead serious about it. While other smartphone makers are scrambling to reach bigger and bigger screen sizes, Palm rebelliously goes the other direction with a phone that’s no bigger, or even smaller, than your palm. And while it might be too easy to classify it as a smartphone accessory like a smartwatch, the new Palm is a bona fide Android phone that will let you leave your actual smartphone at home. That is until you actually need a screen you don’t have to squint at. read more

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iPhone 2019 upgrade Bigger batteries said to power Samsungstyle tech

first_imgStory TimelineThese are Apple’s Spring 2019 iPhone cases and Apple Watch bandsNext iPhones to get Wireless PowerShare, USB-C charging speedsiPhone 11 schematics feed our biggest fear Yes, today’s report claims that 2019’s iPhones will ship with two-way wireless charging, which means that you’ll be able to charge other devices using your phone. The Galaxy S10 lineup is capable of two-way charging as well, and Samsung has been hitting that selling point heavily in its advertising for the new phones.The report, which was published by MacRumors, comes from Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who predicts that two-way wireless charging will feature in Apple’s next batch of iPhones. Obviously, a prediction from an analyst shouldn’t be taken as gospel, but Kuo’s claims do make a lot of sense – especially since Apple just released a new pair of AirPods that come with a wireless charging case.With AirPower out of the equation, wireless charging within the Apple ecosystem has a gap that needs filling, and it’s possible new iPhones could do just that. With two-way wireless charging, iPhone users would be able to charge up their AirPods when they’re out and about, or top off a friend’s device when they’re away from an outlet. Kuo also predicts that Apple will beef up battery capacity in its upcoming phones to facilitate bilateral wireless charging. In the follow-up to the iPhone XS Max, we could see a battery that’s 10-15% larger than what we currently have, while the iPhone XS successor stands to make the biggest gains, with Kuo predicting a 20-25% increase in capacity. The iPhone XR, meanwhile, won’t see much of a boost, as Kuo says the maximum capacity would grow is by 5%. We’ll see if this true soon enough, but Kuo could certainly be onto something when it comes to upcoming iPhones and wireless charging. AirPower might be dead, but Apple still could have some wireless charging tricks up its sleeve. Little is known about 2019’s iPhones – which are still around six months away at this point – but a new report today suggests that they might come with a familiar wireless charging feature. If you know what Samsung’s Galaxy S10 is capable of in the wireless charging arena, then you already know what we’re talking.last_img read more

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Amazons new Prime Air delivery drone features hybrid design

first_imgWhereas standard drones can be controlled with four degrees of freedom, Amazon says its new Prime Air model can be controlled with six degrees of freedom. The additional control options enable the drone to better handle ‘gusty wind’ conditions, at least in terms of stability and safety. Amazon has a new version of its Prime Air delivery drone, and it just unveiled it at the company’s re:MARS 2019 conference. The new model is described as featuring a ‘hybrid design’ with improved stability and efficiency, as well as better safety than the previous version. This model is capable of vertical takeoffs and landings like a helicopter, can fly like an airplane, and may one day bring packages directly to customers. Keeping people on the ground safe was a big focus for the new model, with Amazon describing the Prime Air drone as ‘fully shrouded for safety.’ Thanks in part to artificial intelligence, Amazon describes its new drone as ‘independently safe,’ which means the drone’s various onboard sensors and systems can detect objects and refuse to proceed with any command that could result in the vehicle colliding with those objects.This is important due to the real-life circumstances these drones may find themselves in — one set to land in a customer’s backyard, for example, may have to suddenly change the plan if it detects a close line as it descends. As well, any number of potential objects could get in its way, such as an unexpected bird or balloon in the flight path.AdChoices广告The drone is electric and will be charged using ‘sustainable means,’ according to Amazon, which highlights the product as a key part of its Shipment Zero goal. Electric drones may provide a more environmentally friendly alternative to road-based deliveries, which typically feature gas or diesel vehicles.center_img Story TimelineAmazon’s big privacy push includes deleting Alexa recordings by voiceAmazon interest in Boost Mobile could save Sprint, T-Mobile mergerAmazon StyleSnap uses AI to help users buy the perfect outfitlast_img read more

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Wayves autonomous vehicle can drive unknown roads like a human

first_imgThe algorithm uses machine learning, something more and more autonomous cars are adopting. Wayve says that its system can drive like a human and needs no HD maps, no expensive sensor or compute suite hardware, no hand-coded rules, and can drive on roads it has never seen. The video below shows the car in testing in Cambridge, UK on public roads. The challenge for autonomous vehicles today is that they need lots of data to be able to navigate roads. This means that unknown roads can be a big challenge for the rides. Wayve says that its algorithm can drive on roads it has never seen using cameras and basic sat-nav. Wayve says that it doesn’t have to tell the car how to drive with hand-coded rules; everything is learned from data. The data-driven approach means that the vehicle can navigate complex, narrow urban European streets. The system learns end-to-end according to Wayve and learns like a human via computer vision. The system has imitation learning so it can copy behaviors of expert human drivers.Reinforcement learning allows the vehicle to learn from each safety driver intervention. The model is capable of learning steering and acceleration input. The ability of the system to learn input features from input data most relevant to control makes for reduced sensor and compute cost. The team says its sensor and compute costs are 10% of that of traditional approaches. The video shows the car navigating with a consumer-grade GPS. Wayve notes that the system can navigate in traffic and in the rain.Wayve has given no indication of when its autonomous system might be commercialized. The company does note that its test vehicles have a safety driver behind the wheel at all times.last_img read more

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State Roundup Minn Says Health Exchange Will Cost 40 Million

first_imgNews outlets provide a selection of health care news from Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota and Oregon.MPR: Minn. Estimates Health Insurance Exchange Costs At $40MMinnesota budget officials estimate it could cost the state as much as $40 million to run its health insurance exchange in 2015. The state-based online insurance marketplaces are a cornerstone of the federal health care overhaul. State officials are trying to figure out how to come up with the money. … So far, Minnesota has received about $70 million in federal money to build its exchange — everything from designing the exchange to hiring staff to making contracts with information technology vendors (Stawicki, 10/10). CQ HealthBeat: Illinois Company Challenges HHS Birth Control RuleAnother private firm has filed a suit against a federal rule that requires employers to provide their workers with no-cost coverage of birth control in their health insurance policies. The suit was filed by Korte & Luitjohan Contractors, Inc., of Highland, Ill., which is represented by the American Center for Law and Justice, a legal organization opposed to abortion. The suit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois, and the company owners say the federal rule — required by the health care law — violates their Catholic faith (Norman, 10/11).Kansas Health Institute News: Brownback Officials Continue Push For Jan. 1 KanCare LaunchWith deadlines looming, including one for deciding if the three managed care companies (MCOs) are ready to go, officials in the administration of Gov. Sam Brownback continue their push toward a Jan. 1 launch for the package of Medicaid reforms they call KanCare. … Officials are scheduled to decide Oct. 19 whether the new system is developed enough so that they can begin assigning Medicaid enrollees to the MCOs’ health plans (Shields, 10/10). Reuters: Massachusetts Seeks Compliance Statements From PharmaciesAfter a nationwide meningitis outbreak was tied to drugs shipped from a plant in Massachusetts, the state is requiring all pharmacy compounders to sign a statement saying they are complying with regulations on their work, officials said on Wednesday. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health also confirmed that compounder Ameridose LLC has agreed to close temporarily (Begley, 10/10).Detroit Free Press: Tough Michigan Immunity Law For Drugmakers May Not Apply To Meningitis Cases, Experts Say Michigan is the only state in the country where victims of faulty drugs can’t sue the drugmaker, but experts say those affected by the recent outbreak of meningitis from a fungus-tainted steroid drug compound likely will have legal recourse. The reason: the compounding companies, such as the one that produced the steroid, don’t need approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The immunity law only covers drugs approved by the FDA (Walsh-Sarnecki, 10/11). Georgia Health News: New Pricing Puts Some ‘Miracle’ Drugs Out Of ReachAn increasing number of health plans have gone to different pricing for biologic drugs, causing patients’ out-of-pocket costs to rise by hundreds of dollars per month. [Multiple sclerosis patient Caroline] Kulinski joined patient advocates, health care professionals, industry officials and others at a Wednesday forum at Emory University to promote awareness and an advocacy campaign to address the issue of biologic drug pricing. Their goal is to get action on the issue from the state Legislature (Miller, 10/10).The Lund Report (an Oregon news service): Petition Delays Integration Of Dental Services Into CCOsState officials had been preparing to integrate dental services into the coordinated care organizations (CCOs) on January 1, and had finalized a memorandum of understanding to seek approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. But when a petition signed by two prominent legislators surfaced on Monday, things came to a sudden halt. Sen. Alan Bates (D-Medford) and Rep. Tim Freeman (R-Roseburg) joined Mike Shirtcliff, DMD, president and CEO of Advantage Dental Services, asking for an administrative rules change (Lund-Muzikant, 10/11).The Lund Report: Advocates Want Legislature To Spend Tobacco Agreement Funds On PreventionThe Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement, signed by Oregon and 45 other states in 1998, was supposed to help the state recover some of the states’ tobacco-related healthcare costs. According to the Oregon Partners for Tobacco Prevention, formerly known as the Tobacco Free Coalition of Oregon, the state has yet to use the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement funds as they were intended … the state has spent or committed the majority of its share of the settlement dollars, $1 billion to date, on debt service (Scharer, 10/11). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. State Roundup: Minn. Says Health Exchange Will Cost $40 Millionlast_img read more

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First Edition July 11 2013

first_imgToday’s early morning highlights from the major news organizations including reports from Capitol Hill about GOP efforts to repeal or delay the health law.Kaiser Health News: Health On The Hill: GOP Has ‘Really Busy Month’ Ahead On Health CareKaiser Health News’ Mary Agnes Carey talks with Politico Pro’s Paige Winfield Cunningham about the latest Republican efforts to delay or repeal Obamacare provisions, including postponing a mandate on individuals to carry health insurance. Watch the video or read the transcript. Kaiser Health News: Capsules: Some States Are Pushing “Employee Choice” For Small Business Insurance; Tax Break Can Help With Health Coverage, But There’s A CatchNow on Kaiser Health News’ blog, Julie Appleby reports on a choice some workers will have on a few online health insurance marketplaces: “Small business workers in at least 15 states and the District of Columbia may have a menu of health insurance choices next year, something that didn’t seem likely a few months ago. Back in April, federal officials concerned about the potential for major glitches put off until 2015 a provision that would offer small businesses owners a way to allow their employees to choose from among a variety of competing plans in the new online marketplace being overseen by the Obama administration” (Appleby, 7/11).Also, insurance columnist Michelle Andrews examines a key distinction between the premium subsidy and the cost-sharing subsidies offered to lower income people on the new  marketplaces: “There are two kinds of financial help for people planning to enroll in the online health insurance marketplaces that will open this fall. One could put people at risk of having to pay some of the money back, while the other won’t. That’s one big difference between tax credits and subsidies, both of which are intended to help people with lower incomes pay for health insurance through the new health care law” (Andrews, 7/10). Check out what else is on the blog.The Miami Herald: Educating Florida About Health Care Reform Starts With ConversationThe Miami Herald’s Patricia Borns, in partnership with Kaiser Health News, reports: “Enroll America, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit whose mission is to educate Americans about their healthcare options under the Affordable Care Act, kicked off its Florida campaign Wednesday in Miami with a training session for more than 25 newly hired organizers who will be reaching out to residents statewide” (Borns, 7/10). The New York Times: Democrats Shrug Off Delays And Affirm Support For Health LawCongressional Democrats said Wednesday that they expected to see more delays and snags in President Obama’s efforts to carry out the new health care law, but they affirmed their strong support for the overarching goal of expanded coverage. The comments came in a hearing of a House Ways and Means subcommittee held to investigate the president’s decision last week to delay until 2015 a major provision of the law. It requires employers with more than 50 full-time workers to offer health coverage to them (Pear, 7/10).NPR: GOP Says, Why Not Delay That Health Care Law, Like, Forever?Sensing that recent delays in key portions of the Affordable Care Act have caught the Obama administration at a weak point in its rollout of the law, Republicans in Congress are doubling down on their efforts to cripple the measure, at least in the eyes of the public if not in fact. “Rather than a partial delay for some, America needs a permanent delay for all,” said Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., at a news conference Wednesday on Capitol Hill. Thune got 45 other GOP senators to sign onto a letter to the president urging him to shelve the law entirely. … Across the Capitol, where GOP leaders have already vowed to hold a vote to delay that very individual mandate, the House Ways and Means health subcommittee held a hearing, allegedly to explore what it called the administration’s “strangely timed announcement” that it was delaying the employer mandate (Rovner, 7/11).Politico: Role Reversal: GOP Members Dispense Obamacare AdviceRepublican lawmakers have spent the past three years blasting Obamacare, but now they have a new role: helping people sign up for it. It’s a role reversal that puts party politics at odds with constituent service. Even Obamacare’s most strident opponents say that if people call their offices looking for help when enrollment starts in October, they’ll direct their staff to assist (Haberkorn, 7/10).Politico: Congressional Black Caucus To Launch Obamacare TourDepartment of Health & Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius won’t be alone when she’s on the road pitching Obamacare this summer. Members of the Congressional Black Caucus are planning an eight-city tour of their own to “ensure communities are equipped with the information they need” to access health insurance exchanges and understand the impact of the health law. It’s not about the politics but about getting community members the facts they need, they say (Cheney, 7/11).USA Today: Health Care Law Opponents Dominate Advertising WarsOpponents of the 2010 health care law have out-spent supporters by nearly 5-1 on the airwaves — as conservatives seek to cast doubts about its effects and pledge to keep it at the forefront of federal, state and local races, an analysis shows. Critics of the Affordable Care Act spent at least $385 million from March 2010, when Congress enacted the sweeping health care measure, through the end of last month, according to an analysis of TV advertising nationwide by Kantar Media. The biggest spender among opponents: Crossroads GPS, a political advocacy group affiliated with Republican strategist Karl Rove (Schouten, 7/10).The Washington Post: Q: What Do Porta-Potties, Coffee Cups And Airplanes Have In Common? A: Obamacare.In Connecticut, selling Obamacare involves renting an airplane. Oregon might try to reel in hipsters with branded coffee cups for their lattes. And in neighboring Washington, the effort could get quite intimate: The state is interested in sponsoring portable toilets at concerts in an effort to reach uninsured young adults. With 83 days left until the health law’s insurance marketplaces open for business, public awareness remains low. Most polling data suggest that few Americans are aware of how the Affordable Care Act works – or that it even exists (Kliff, 7/10).The New York Times: Maryland’s Path To An Accord In Abortion FightThe 18-year-old woman arrived at Johns Hopkins Hospital by medevac helicopter in critical condition. Her uterus and bowel had been pierced during a late-term abortion that had started in New Jersey and ended at an unmarked, unregulated clinic in Elkton, in northeastern Maryland. … The near disaster in an Elkton mall led to something rare in this era of polarized abortion politics — sharply tightened oversight of Maryland abortion clinics that came into full force this year and won praise from both sides of the political divide (Eckholm, 7/10).The Washington Post: Four Decades After Roe V. Wade, Views Of Most Americans Still Complex, ConditionalThe absolutist voices have always dominated the abortion debate. But as it flares again in Congress and in legislatures across the country, the fight this time is heading into complicated political terrain, stirring the ambivalence that most Americans feel about the issue. … Fine lines are not something activists on either side often recognize. But four decades after the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Roe v. Wade, the views of most of Americans on abortion remain complex and conditional (Tumulty, 7/10).Politico: Marco Rubio: Abortion Bill A ‘Work In Progress’Sen. Marco Rubio is “very supportive” of the effort to introduce a bill banning abortion after 20 weeks, and is working with other senators on the bill, he told POLITICO. The Florida Republican wouldn’t say whether he will be a lead sponsor of the proposed legislation (Everett, 7/10).Politico: Democrats Say GOP Playing Politics With AbortionSenate Democrats on Wednesday sharply criticized a House-passed bill that would ban abortions after 20 weeks, disparaging it as an “extreme and dangerous” attack on women’s health. The bill stands no chance of passing the Democratic-controlled Senate but has nonetheless incensed abortion rights activists and others on the left (Delreal, 7/10).The New York Times: Texas House Passes Measure Tightening Clinic Rules And Restricting Access To AbortionThe Texas House of Representatives passed a vigorously contested bill on Wednesday restricting access to abortion. … The bill, like its predecessor, would ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy and hold abortion clinics to the same standards as hospital-style surgical centers, among other requirements. Its supporters argue that the heightened requirements will protect women’s health; opponents counter that the restrictions are intended solely as a burden on the clinics that perform abortions and will impose expenses that will force many of them to close (Schwartz, 7/10).Los Angeles Times: Texas Abortion Bill Headed To Senate After House Votes A restrictive abortion bill is heading to the floor of the Texas Senate after the state’s House of Representatives approved the legislation Wednesday on a 96-49 vote. The Republican-dominated House voted mostly along party lines, a day after more than 10 hours of debate. Lawmakers rejected all proposed amendments to the bill. … The Senate is expected to take up the bill Thursday and could vote on it as early as Friday (Kelly, 7/10).The New York Times: In Health-Conscious Denver, Limits On Group ExerciseIn Denver, one of the healthiest cities in America, fitness fans are fuming over rules from the city and private officials that restrict group exercise in parks and open spaces. “You can smoke pot, but you can’t exercise,” Mr. Lindley said, as the scent of a newly legalized substance drifted past. “This is Colorado.” A skirmish over exercise in the public square seems fitting in a place where people spend more on road bikes than on their cars, and Lycra attire is the unofficial uniform of the weekend (Healy, 7/10).The Wall Street Journal: Americans Are Living Longer, But Not Necessarily Healthier, Study Shows Americans are living longer than they did two decades ago, but they are losing ground on key measures of health to people in other developed nations, a new study shows. The findings, from the most comprehensive analysis of the health of the U.S. population in more than 15 years, show progress in reducing death rates, adjusted for age, across a variety of diseases. But death rates from illnesses associated with obesity, such as diabetes and kidney disease, as well as neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, are on the rise (Winslow, 7/10).Los Angeles Times: We’re Exercising More But Still Fighting Obesity, Study ShowsAmericans are exercising more, but that has not done much to slim their waistlines, underscoring the immense challenge confronting doctors and health advocates fighting the nation’s obesity crisis. In more than two-thirds of the nation’s counties — including some of the unhealthiest — men and women became more physically active over the last decade, according to data published Wednesday in the online journal Population Health Metrics. Three-quarters of California’s counties saw gains in physical fitness for both men and women (Levey and Gorman, 7/10).The Wall Street Journal: CMS Steps In To Settle Gamma Knife-Varian FightThe Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has proposed a new rule that would effectively put to rest a provision inserted into last year’s fiscal cliff bill by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) to help a U.S. company. The original provision threatened to slash payments to the Swedish maker of a radiosurgical device called the Gamma Knife, thereby helping its competitor, a U.S. company that makes Linac – short for linear accelerator — machines (Mundy, 7/10).Check out all of Kaiser Health News’ e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page. First Edition: July 11, 2013 This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Are They Talking Mixed Messages On Whether Texas Is Seeking Health Law

first_imgAre They Talking? Mixed Messages On Whether Texas Is Seeking Health Law Funds News outlets try to pin down whether Texas officials are in discussions with the Obama administration to gain access to an estimated $100 million in health law funds. Meanwhile, a South Dakota panel lays out the pros and cons of expanding Medicaid in that state. Politico: Obamacare Critic Rick Perry Seeks Cash From LawGov. Rick Perry wants to kill Obamacare dead, but Texas health officials are in talks with the Obama administration about accepting an estimated $100 million available through the health law to care for the elderly and disabled, POLITICO has learned. Perry health aides are negotiating with the Obama administration on the terms of an optional Obamacare program that would allow Texas to claim stepped-up Medicaid funding for the care of people with disabilities (Cheney and Haberman, 8/20).Texas Tribune: Governor’s Office: We’re Not Negotiating On ObamacareGov. Rick Perry’s office is disputing reports that the state is negotiating with the federal government to draw down $100 million in additional financing under a rule created by the Affordable Care Act. Politico reported on Tuesday that Texas is taking advantage of the Community First Choice program, which was set up under “Obamacare” to increase federal Medicaid matching funds for home attendant services, so that more people with disabilities could receive community-based services (Aaronson, 8/20).And in South Dakota, a panel turns in its final report on Medicaid expansion – The Associated Press: SD Task Force Finishes Medicaid Expansion StudyAn expansion of South Dakota’s Medicaid program would improve health care for thousands of low-income people and could boost the state economy, but it also could put a strain on medical providers and increase state spending, a task force decided Tuesday. The task force, appointed by Gov. Dennis Daugaard to study the issue, was set up to identify the advantages and disadvantages of expanding Medicaid (Brokaw, 8/20). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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State Highlights Ariz Group Urges Public Hospital Changes

first_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. State Highlights: Ariz. Group Urges Public Hospital Changes A selection of health policy stories from Arizona, Florida, California and Pennsylvania.Reuters: Vaccine Exemption Bills Often Introduced But Rarely Passed Legislation to change whether parents may refuse school vaccinations for their children appears to be common in some states, according to a new analysis. However, those bills are rarely passed into law. Researchers identified 36 bills that were introduced in 18 state legislatures between 2009 and 2012 to change school immunization requirements. Most of those bills aimed to allow more parents the ability to refuse vaccinations for their children (Seaman, 2/12).The Arizona Republic: Maricopa County Health Overhaul UrgedA citizens committee has endorsed a $935 million overhaul of Maricopa County’s public hospital system to decentralize its services and improve access to health care for the Valley’s poorest residents. County voters likely will be asked this November to approve a bond initiative capped at $935 million to pay for a new county hospital, a new behavioral-health facility and new, expanded or renovated clinics throughout the Valley, mainly in areas with the most underserved and uninsured patients. The 15-member committee’s final report, approved unanimously Wednesday, essentially validates hospital executives’ long-standing desire to transition the Maricopa Integrated Health System into a network of community-based clinics that provide primary, preventive, specialty and outpatient care (Lee, 2/12).Kaiser Health News: Florida Moves To Manage Health Care For Foster KidsChris and Alicia Johnson have 10 kids — three biological, five adopted out of foster care and two foster children — all under one roof on the outskirts of Orlando, Fla. While providing love, support and encouragement for their foster kids, they’ve sometimes run into roadblocks trying to get them health care, including needed mental health services, because few providers take Medicaid insurance. Another problem? Not being able to take foster children in different health care plans to the same doctors. Those difficulties are not unusual for the nation’s nearly 400,000 foster children, whose health care can be complicated by cycling from one placement to another, undiagnosed childhood trauma and a failure to receive preventive care, according to experts (Evans, 2/13).Los Angeles Times: Animosity Between Head Of AIDS Group, L.A. County Supervisor Emerges Long-simmering animosity between two Los Angeles political figures reached new heights this week when their bad blood surfaced in a footnote attached to a federal judge’s ruling. The footnote revealed a series of vitriolic remarks made by AIDS Healthcare Foundation President Michael Weinstein about Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky (Sewell, 2/12).NPR: Judge Dismisses Assisted Suicide Case Against Pennsylvania NurseA Pennsylvania county judge has thrown out an assisted suicide case against a 58-year-old nurse named Barbara Mancini, who was accused of homicide last year for allegedly handing her 93-year-old father a bottle of morphine. The decision is the latest in a series of recent developments signaling a reluctance of courts and state legislatures to criminalize medical care that may hasten death (Knox, 2/12).last_img read more

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CMS Wont Review Billings Despite IG Report That It Overpays Doctors

first_imgCMS Won’t Review Billings Despite IG Report That It Overpays Doctors This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. The move comes even as a report points at $6.7 billion in overspending in Medicare. The HHS inspector general also says that the program paid $457 million in 2012 to detect drugs after a sharp increase in prescription drug abuse.NPR: Medicare Frequently Overpays Doctors For Patients’ VisitsMedicare spent $6.7 billion too much for office visits and other patient evaluations in 2010, according to a report from the inspector general of the Department of Health and Human Services. But in its reply to the findings, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which runs Medicare, said it doesn’t plan to review the billings of doctors who almost always charge for the most expensive visits because it isn’t cost-effective to do so (Ornstein, 5/29).MSNBC: Medicare Paid Millions Of Dollars For Wrongdoings, Report FindsMedicare paid doctors $457 million in 2012 for 16 million tests to detect drugs — from prescription narcotics to heroin, according to a new report from Reuters. A sharp rise in prescription drug abuse among older Americans has caused a nationwide increase in urine and blood tests, procedures that typically are potential areas of fraud among providers. The Office of the Inspector General of Health and Human Services, which heads Medicare, first started investigating scams in such tests in 2011 (Richinick, 5/29).Reuters: Exclusive: Medicare On Drugs: 24,000 Tests For 145 Patients Three Connecticut doctors billed Medicare for nearly 24,000 drug tests in 2012 – on just 145 patients. Despite the extraordinary number, Medicare administrators paid the doctors a total of $1.4 million, according to a Reuters analysis of government payments to health providers. The three physicians stand out in the Medicare data released last month because they conducted three to four times more drug tests per patient than any other provider in the country. In fact, they ordered so many individual tests, their patients averaged one every other day (Pell and Begley, 4/29).last_img read more

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Despite Progress VA Wait Times Persist

first_img USA Today: New Data Show Long Wait Times Remain At Many VA Hospitals More than 600,000 veterans — 10% of all the Veterans Affairs patients — continue to wait a month or more for appointments at VA hospitals and clinics, according to data obtained by USA TODAY. The VA has made some progress in dealing with the backlog of cases that forced former secretary Eric Shinseki to retire early this year. For instance, the VA substantially cut the overall number of worst-case scenarios for veterans — those who had waited more than four months for an appointment. That figure dropped from 120,000 in May to 23,000 in October. Much of that improvement occurred because patients received care from private providers. (Hoyer and Vanden Brook, 11/16) This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.center_img Despite Progress, VA Wait Times Persist New data show 10 percent of all Veterans Affairs patients are still waiting a month or longer for appointments, USA Today reports.last_img read more

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Executive Bonuses May Be Root Of EpiPens Hefty Price Hikes

first_img The Wall Street Journal: EpiPen Maker Mylan Tied Executive Pay To Aggressive Profit Targets Politico Pro: EpiPen Paid Generic Drug Prices To Medicaid, While Profiting From Brand-Drug Protections  A loophole in how CMS defined an “innovator” drug was a big win for Mylan’s EpiPen. Under Medicaid, the life-saving anti-allergy injection was considered a generic or “non-innovator” medicine, which meant the company paid lower rebates to the government. Yet at the same time, it got all the market monopoly and patent protection of an FDA-approved brand-name drug. (Karlin-Smith, 9/1) Heather Bresch, chief executive at Mylan, the pharmaceutical giant that has been vilified for price increases on its EpiPen allergy treatment, maintains that her company has attained a sort of capitalist nirvana — it does good for others while doing well for itself. But the argument that Mylan has achieved a balance benefiting all of its stakeholders simply doesn’t hold up when viewed through the prism of the company’s recent proxy filings. Those materials detail the company’s executive pay and show, for example, that Mylan’s top brass received a windfall when it incorporated overseas in 2014 to cut its tax bill sharply. (Morgenson, 9/1) The drugmaker at the center of a firestorm over hefty price increases on the lifesaving EpiPen put a special incentive plan in place more than two years ago that rewards executives if they hit aggressive profit targets. In early 2014, the board of Mylan NV approved a one-time award for more than 100 employees that hinged on more than doubling the company’s adjusted per-share earnings over a five-year period ending in 2018, Mylan’s regulatory filings show. Meeting that goal would require 16% compound annual earnings growth—a tall order for a company that generated almost 90% of its revenue from the generally mature generic-drug business. (Maremont, 9/1) center_img The New York Times: EpiPen Price Increases Could Mean More Riches For Executives Executive Bonuses May Be Root Of EpiPen’s Hefty Price Hikes Under a special, one-time stock grant created in 2014, top executives — including Chief Executive Heather Bresch — will be rewarded if the company’s earnings and stock price meet certain goals by the end of 2018. Meanwhile, a loophole allowed the company to use generic prices in its rebates to Medicaid. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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State Highlights Nev Gov Vetoes Controversial Bill Aiming To Contain Diabetes Drug

first_img San Jose Mercury News: Right To Die Law: Patients Struggle To Find Doctors Who Will Help Stat: Nevada Governor Vetoes Bill That Targeted Diabetes Drug Costs State Highlights: Nev. Gov. Vetoes Controversial Bill Aiming To Contain Diabetes Drug Costs; Texas Lawmakers Make Little Progress In Effort To Address State’s High Maternal Mortality Rate Media outlets report on health-related news from Nevada, Texas, California, Virginia, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts and Connecticut. Nail polish and hair dye. Cleaning products. Plants and flowers for the garden. California lawmakers have been considering new labels for them, triggering an annual conflict in the Capitol over how much to tell people about what they buy at the store or use at work. The bills reflect a recurring tension in the statehouse: Environmentalists and consumer advocates argue that people have a right to know what’s in everyday products, while industry lobbyists say putting too much information on a label could harm sales by creating unfounded fear. In most cases, industry wins. (Rosenhall, 6/5) To understand why teen pregnancy rates are so high in Texas, meet Jessica Chester. When Chester was at in high school in Garland, she decided to attend the University of Texas at Dallas. She wanted to become a doctor. “I was top of the class,” she says. “I had a GPA of 4.5, a full-tuition scholarship to UTD. I was not the stereotypical girl someone would look at and say, ‘Oh, she’s going to get pregnant and drop out of school.'” (Silverman, 6/5) Chicago Tribune: Blue Cross Customer Treatment Examined, 27 Years After Last Report Released Lawmakers in Texas largely failed to take any significant action to address the state’s skyrocketing rate of pregnancy-related deaths just months after researchers found it to be the highest in not only the U.S., but the developed world. Legislators introduced proposals to address the issue after a University of Maryland-led study found that the state’s maternal mortality rate doubled between 2010 and 2012. But several key measures didn’t even make it to a vote, falling victim to Republican infighting over other issues. (Hoffman, 6/4) The State Senate has given unanimous approval to a bill that would ensure fertility coverage for those facing chemotherapy or some other medically necessary treatment that threatens their ability to have children. The measure, approved late Friday, was passed unanimously by the House on May 25 and now heads to Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s desk. (Phaneuf, 6/3) It’s been nearly a year since California began allowing terminally ill residents to end their lives with the help of a physician. And for Ray Perman, the right-to-die law worked exactly as lawmakers intended. On Feb. 4, as his family gathered around his bed, the 64-year-old Piedmont resident ingested a lethal dose of sedatives and passed away peacefully — in his own home, on his own terms — after years of battling cancer. Other terminal patients have been known to add a flourish to their final moments of life: a last cigarette, a shot of vodka, a favorite pet curled up with them in bed. (Seipel, 6/3) California Healthline: A Community Seeks Answers, Assurances About Health Care — In 10 Languages More than a half-dozen people died at a state-run residential facility in Virginia from infections that typically are easy to treat with antibiotics. The state has acknowledged the deaths, which first were identified by a nonprofit watchdog organization that advocates for people with disabilities. Several of the residents who died, state officials also noted, had other medical issues. Six deaths connected to urinary tract infections occurred within a 14-month period, part of a pattern documented by the Richmond-based DisAbility Law Center of Virginia, which monitors state institutions. (Marimow, 6/2) The CT Mirror: Fertility Preservation Bill Goes To Governor’s Desk Health News Florida: Prison Agency Asks Judge To Reject Hepatitis Arguments Illinois is conducting a broad review of how Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois treats consumers — 27 years after regulators last released such a report on the state’s dominant health insurer. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois confirmed the review this week, in response to questions from the Tribune about why it had been nearly three decades since the state publicly released a wide-ranging examination of the insurer’s compliance with laws and regulations meant to protect consumers. Such reviews, conducted by states across the country, often look at how insurance companies advertise, enroll customers, pay medical claims and handle complaints. They’re separate from rate reviews. (Schencker, 6/2) center_img The Associated Press: Texas Lawmakers Make Few Moves To Address Pregnancy Deaths A Jacksonville children’s hospital is challenging a decision by the Florida Department of Health that prevented the hospital from opening a trauma center. Wolfson Children’s Hospital wants an administrative law judge to back arguments that it should be allowed to open what is known as a “provisional” pediatric trauma center, according to documents posted Thursday on the state Division of Administrative Hearings website. (6/2) NPR: Teen Pregnancy Rates Remain Stubbornly High In Some Parts Of Texas WBUR: Patients Wait Hours, Days As Demand For ER Psychiatric Beds Grows Health News Florida: Children’s Hospital Challenges Trauma Center Denial For five straight days this spring, Patty — who doesn’t want her last name used to protect her son’s privacy — sought refuge in the chapel at Heywood Hospital in Gardner. That’s where her 28-year-old son Eric had been waiting for a psychiatric treatment bed. “The person that’s having that breakdown is not the son that I know,” Patty says. “I don’t want him to see me crying over it, so sometimes I walk to the chapel and just be quiet in here.” (6/5) Ten years ago, Mary Thach unexpectedly needed throat surgery to improve her breathing and spent two weeks in the hospital. Her bill: $69,000.Her first reaction was panic, said Thach, speaking through a Vietnamese interpreter. Uninsured at the time, she had no idea how to come up with the money. Then she learned from the hospital staff that as a low-income legal resident, she qualified for Medicaid, which ultimately paid the bill. (Ibarra and Browning, 6/2) A controversial bill to lower costs of diabetes drugs was vetoed on Friday by the Nevada governor, the latest of many efforts by state legislators to fail to contain rising medicine prices. The bill would have required drug makers to report pricing histories, disclose costs, notify state officials and insurers in advance of price hikes above inflation, and report rebates paid to pharmacy benefit managers, the middlemen that negotiate favorable insurance coverage. (Silverman, 6/3) The Florida Department of Corrections this week asked a federal judge to reject arguments that it violated the Americans with Disabilities Act by not providing “cutting edge” drugs to prisoners with hepatitis C. Three inmates filed a class-action lawsuit in May alleging that the department is failing to provide proper care to thousands of prisoners with liver-damaging hepatitis C. (6/2) San Jose Mercury News: In California Battles Over Product Labels, Industry Usually Wins The Washington Post: Watchdog Group Reports Seven Deaths From ‘Preventable’ Infections At State Facility This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. 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The iPhone 11 will almost certainly look like this – and thats

first_img Yet another sea of leaks have emerged lending credence to rumblings it won’t be the prettiest handset at the ball.The latest leak stemmed from Bloomberg writer Mark Gurman on Sunday (US time). The report showcased ‘leaked’ moldings for the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Max and iPhone XR 2.Alleged next iPhone case moldings show what we discussed in our story last week in terms of new cameras. 3 on the high end, 2 on the new XR. Plus all models apparently getting a square, at least based on this one mold floating around. https://t.co/BhAFTZZL6u pic.twitter.com/QlNJTsApzX— Mark Gurman (@markgurman) May 13, 2019The molds aren’t official and as ever Apple doesn’t comment on “rumour and speculation”, but they match a number of previous leaks about the new iPhones’ design. The molds showcase a noticeable square housing for the iPhones’ camera sensors.As previously reported the bump shows off a tri-camera setup for the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Max and a dual-camera system for the supposedly more affordable iPhone XR 2.Related: Best iPhoneThe bump on show is fairly sizable and appears to protrude at least a couple of millimetres off the phones’ back. We here at Trusted Towers aren’t a huge fan of it, and think it makes the design significantly less alluring Android flagships, like the Galaxy S10 and Huawei P30 Pro, which have much more elegant looking camera housings.Normally we’d take leaks with a hefty pinch of salt, but given the sea of uniform reports emerging about the iPhone 11’s design the trend is hard to ignore. The spec would also make sense given the current state of the smartphone market.Related: Best smartphoneTri-camera systems are a common site on Android flagships. The Galaxy S10 and Huawei P30 families both have them.Related: OnePlus 7 Pro reviewNone of the information is official however, and given the long lead time before Apple is expected to unveil new iPhones the design could change, even if the molds on show in the latest leak are legit.It’s also still up for debate if Apple plans to release a new iPhone XR 2, or a follow up to its small hand friend iPhone SE. We’ve seen concurrent reports the company is developing a small-form-factor iPhone SE 2 that’ll replace the iPhone XR as Apple’s sort-of-affordable handset. iPhone 11 Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy.center_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.last_img read more

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Apple is looking to snap up exclusive rights to some of your

first_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Apple is reaching out to media outfits with the aim of securing exclusive rights for podcasts, if reports are to be believed. Bloomberg is reporting that Apple is hoping to bring exclusive original shows and content to its own podcast-listening platform, citing unnamed sources. This is a substantial change for Apple, which usually allows shows on Apple Podcasts to make their episodes available elsewhere. This will definitely change if these Apple exclusivity claims turn into something tangible, meaning you might only be able to listen to certain podcasts on Apple’s app, but it is also possible the exclusivity could be a timed deal, meaning Apple has the latest podcasts first for a time-window before they become available everywhere. Related: Best iPhone 2019Apple’s podcast app has always been phenomenally popular, with the lion’s share of podcast listeners. However, the podcast industry and its global audience has grown massively over the last few years, with more competitors for Apple’s throne appearing each year. All of them are trying to take some of Apple’s audience, eating away at their dominance in the space. This could mark the first time Apple has flexed their muscle in keeping the lead. Still, now that the company is facing competition from Spotify, Google and a host of other smaller outfits that have also made in-roads into the podcasting space, every provider is now being forced to evaluate what they can bring to the table.However, if this does turn out to be true, it mirrors what Apple are doing with their TV+ streaming service which, in case you’ve forgotten, has a host of TV shows planned to come from a wide variety of stars, including the most exciting team-up since The Avengers, a series about mental health produced by the dynamic duo of Oprah Winfrey and Prince Harry.  This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

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