Cameron Bailey aims for more walkable TIFF in 2017

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement If there’s a new spring in the step of Cameron Bailey, TIFF’s artistic director, there are two good reasons for it.The first is the happy surprise of the Best Picture win for Moonlight at last Sunday’s Academy Awards. Bailey selected Barry Jenkins’ coming-of-age phenomenon to make its international premiere in the Platform section of the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival, brilliantly fulfilling the new program’s mandate to seek out and showcase fresh talent.Moonlight is screening at TIFF Bell Lightbox, the festival’s HQ at King and John Sts., marking the first time since the facility opened in 2010 that a film’s Lightbox run coincided with its Best Picture crowning.center_img “It’s still playing!” a delighted Bailey says in an interview in a TIFF meeting room.“We’ve never had a Best Picture Oscar winner on a run in the building, so that’s amazing.” Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The second reason for Bailey’s joyful motion is he’s eager to get TIFF goers back on the good foot. The festival announced major changes last week, among them a 20 per cent reduction in films shown — more on that in a second — and a farewell to Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema and the Isabel Bader Theatre as fest screening venues.last_img read more

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Artist of stolen 18K bulletriddled Bieber painting says thief called him to

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter Later that night, the artist and the thief talked on the phone.“He sounded terrible,” Mitic told As It Happens guest host Helen Mann. “He sounded like he really wanted a way out.”READ MORE Facebook Advertisementcenter_img This painting, appraised at $18,000, was stolen during a TIFF event. (Viktor Mitic) Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Toronto artist Viktor Mitic says he was contacted by the thief who stole his bullet-riddled portrait of Justin Bieber from a Toronto gallery, supposedly on a drunken dare.The painting, appraised at $18,000, disappeared from its debut appearance at the Campbell House Museum during a Toronto International Film Festival event the week before last.Mitic thought it was lost forever, until he got a surprising email on Tuesday morning from a man who claimed he’d swiped the painting on a dare after having “a bit too much to drink” during a series of festival parties.last_img read more

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Ballet Victoria cuts ties with choreographer after allegations he took nude photos

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter He is facing two lawsuits, one filed by a woman in Winnipeg alleging he took nude photos of her when she was 16, and a proposed class-action lawsuit filed in Toronto.In a statement of defence in response to the Winnipeg suit, Monk denies taking any photographs of the woman when she was a minor and calls her allegations “false and meritless.” VANCOUVER – Ballet Victoria has cut ties with a choreographer after renewed media attention to allegations that he took nude photographs of underage dancers in the 1980s and 1990s.Bruce Monk was fired by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in 2015 after Maclean’s reported that several women were co-operating with a Winnipeg police investigation into photos he took of them as teenage dancers.The investigation concluded without charges and Monk declined comment on the allegations this week through his lawyer. Facebookcenter_img Advertisement Advertisement CBC reported on Monday that Monk has been doing volunteer and contract work with Ballet Victoria. Artistic director Paul Destrooper is quoted in the article as saying he believes Monk is innocent and nude photographs are not unusual in ballet.On Wednesday, Ballet Victoria issued a statement saying Monk would no longer work with the company.“Ballet Victoria cares for the physical and emotional health of all artists, staff and volunteers with great care and diligence,” it says. “To (ensure) the integrity of the company Bruce Monk will no longer be involved with Ballet Victoria.”The statement says Destrooper worked with Monk at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet for 11 years from 1990 until 2001 and was never aware of any inappropriate behaviour or allegations.It says Monk came to the company as a guest choreographer in 2008. When criminal allegations were made, the working relationship was suspended, but it resumed when no charges were laid.In late 2016, he began working on small contracts as a lighting and production designer and volunteered his services in the office and as a driver, the statement says.Sarah Doucet, who filed the proposed class-action suit in Toronto, said she first became aware Monk was involved with Ballet Victoria in September 2015 when she saw a photo of him rehearsing with a woman on the company’s Facebook page. She said she contacted the company’s board.When the company severed ties with Monk on Wednesday, Doucet said she felt relief.“It’s unfortunate that it took public pressure for Ballet Victoria to finally do the right thing,” said Doucet.Doucet alleges in her statement of claim that she was a student at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s dance school, aged about 16 or 17, when she approached Monk to take photos for her portfolio, as it was common knowledge that the instructor would take headshots of students.She says he complained the straps of her bodysuit were ruining her neckline and alleges that he coerced her into removing the top half of the bodysuit, so her torso was naked. She was humiliated and overwhelmed by a deep sense of personal violation, the lawsuit alleges.None of the allegations has been proven in court and the class action has not been certified. The Canadian Press was not able to determine if a statement of defence has been filed in the case.Doucet’s lawyer, Margaret Waddell, said a court date is scheduled for the end of November to set a timetable for proceeding with the certification motion and she hopes to have it heard early in 2018.THE CANADIAN PRESS LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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Hilarious clips and untold memories bring audience to its feet at SCTV

first_imgFans of SCTV were served a heaping dish of nostalgia on Sunday as cast members of the Canadian sketch comedy series gathered to share memories for an upcoming Netflix special.Seemingly every popular character from the influential show — including Johnny LaRue, Alex Trebel and Edith Prickley — had a moment to shine during the three-hour live taping at Toronto’s Elgin Theatre. The footage will be part of a larger production directed by Martin Scorsese for the streaming platform. Twitter SCTV cast members Joe Flaherty, Eugene Levy, Andrea Martin, Martin Short and Catherine O’Hara sat before a backdrop of photographs from the series as they recalled how the scrappy idea for a comedy show began on Global with a tight budget of $7,000 an episode.Other revealing moments included Dave Thomas and Rick Moranis reflecting on how seminal hosers Bob and Doug McKenzie were originally created as a way to inject more Canadian content into the series. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

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SOAKING UP SUNDANCE CANADIAN CREATORS ARE UTAHBOUND

first_imgChalk it up to president and founder Robert Redford’s enduring star power, if you will; but don’t underestimate the impressive clout that his little winter cinema celebration amid the ski hills of Utah has accrued over the past four decades.The Sundance Film Festival, and its irreverent offshoot Slamdance, are coveted launch pads for any media project, as confirmed by the Canadian creators who will be travelling to Park City next week.Quebec auteurs are well served this year, with virtual-reality stars and Sundance regulars Felix & Paul premièring two high-profile creations, including a nighttime ride through Detroit with rap star Eminem. They will be flanked by two Canadian co-productions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and a pair of offbeat features at Slamdance.Meanwhile, Toronto filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal and collaborators Nicholas de Pencier and Edward Burtynsky contribute their essential climate-change doc Anthropocene: The Human Epoch to Sundance’s always substantial environmentally themed programming.Here’s what they had to say about the opportunity to take part in one of North America’s top film festivals. Advertisement Facebook Advertisement Chalk it up to president and founder Robert Redford’s enduring star power, if you will; but don’t underestimate the impressive clout that his little winter cinema celebration amid the ski hills of Utah has accrued over the past four decades.The Sundance Film Festival, and its irreverent offshoot Slamdance, are coveted launch pads for any media project, as confirmed by the Canadian creators who will be travelling to Park City next week.Quebec auteurs are well served this year, with virtual-reality stars and Sundance regulars Felix & Paul premièring two high-profile creations, including a nighttime ride through Detroit with rap star Eminem. They will be flanked by two Canadian co-productions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and a pair of offbeat features at Slamdance. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Virtual-reality masters Felix Lajeunesse, left, and Paul Raphael are heading to Sundance for the fifth straight year. The festival “remains one of the most important and interesting places in terms of seeing what everyone is doing” says Raphael. Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Manitoba government faces fire over treatment of children in care

first_imgAPTN National NewsManitoba’s auditor general has a new report on the provincial government’s handling of child and family services.With the large number of children in foster care and a poor track record in managing, the NDP government is coming under attack for failing to make children in crisis a priority.APTN National News reporter Ntawnis Piapot has this story.last_img

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A story for every month Edmonton Elders offer stories for Indigenous women

first_imgChris Stewart APTN News A group of Edmonton Elders have put some stories together in a new calendar aimed at Indigenous women that they hope will offer some insight into traditions that go back centuries.“We had our own way a long time ago,” said Elder Elsie Paul, a Cree-Metis grandmother born in the Wolf Lake Metis settlement. “Before European contact to nature is our teacher.”Paul is retired but is still busy most days as the president of the Kohkom Kisewaisowin Society.She is busy teaching people about Indigenous traditional values.The society is an Edmonton based group of Kohkoms who share their knowledge.Now she is teaming up with a publisher to release a special calendar that has women focused stories that go back hundreds of years.The 15-month calendar has 15 stories from Indigenous and Metis grandmothers.Each story is told by a Kohkom who wanted to pass on a story to the pass on a story to the young generations.“So learning about traditional foods, ceremonies, storytelling,” she said. “All of that is covered in this.”You can see the calendars at circleteachings.ca.last_img read more

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You dont forget Family didnt know who to call when Inuk woman

first_imgLucy ScholeyAPTN NewsSarah Nowyakallak thought a search party was looking for her big sister who went missing in Montreal.Back home in Inukjuak, a fly-in Nunavik community that sits on the Hudson Bay, she said hunters and community members would set out to find missing people. But in the big city, it appeared there was little effort to find out what happened to Alacie Nowyakallak.The 34-year-old disappeared in early October 1994. Her body was found in the St. Lawrence River almost a month later. The family says it has yet to see a police report on Alacie’s death.“Every time I come to Montreal, I think of her,” Sarah said during the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls on Wednesday.The third day of the hearings in Montreal focused on the stories of Inuit women from Nunavik in northern Quebec. According to the 2016 census, 7.6 per cent of Indigenous people in the Francophone province identify as Inuit.Though Sarah and Alacie were biologically cousins, Sarah was adopted into the Nowyakallak family when she was young. She described how she grew up with her seven cousins, who she considers siblings.“I was not raised with people drinking or doing drugs of any sort,” she said, adding how her father was a hunter, carver and fisher who provided for the family, while her mother was a seamstress and housekeeper.“I loved my childhood.”Alacie started spending more time in Montreal. When her mother went to visit, Alacie did not show up. The family reported her missing, but Sarah testified how they didn’t hear news until police found Alacie’s body.“We didn’t know what number to call to try to find out,” she said.Olivier Gianolla, a long-time family friend from Montreal’s Notre-Dame-de-Grâce neighbourhood, started investigating. He went to areas he knew Alacie frequented and contacted her boyfriend and police.By the time Alacie’s body was pulled from the St. Lawrence River, she could only be identified by the necklaces she was wearing.“They could not recognize her because her body was in the water so long,” said Sarah.The family received a coroner’s report, which they said was vague and contained limited information.After the inquiry, Lizzie Calvin said her cousin Alacie loved children and wanted a family of her own.But when Alacie needed her appendix removed, the medical team removed her ovaries as well.Calvin said the family wants to find peace – but they need answers.“It’s always there. You don’t forget.”The inquiry also heard testimonies of domestic violence and a northern culture that encourages women to stay in the marriage.Rebecca Jones, a survivor of domestic abuse who has lived in Coral Harbour, Nunavut, said the prevalence of sexual violence up north forced her to leave.“I didn’t want my children to grow up thinking that that’s normal,” said Jones, who’s now a coordinator for the violence prevention program at the Ottawa Inuit Children’s Centre (OICC).Yet she’s faced racism living in southern Canada, she said, noting that she often has to explain her background and the difference between Inuit, Metis and First Nations.“It’s that lack of education, the assumption that we’re all drunks,” she said.Echoing the testimony of other women that day, Jones said more education, northern resources and Inuit-specific services are needed, including healing circles.Through the OICC, Jones has helped develop a toolkit for women that includes resources Inuit women can seek out and emergency numbers. It will be printed out and distributed in Ottawa and in northern communities.lscholey@aptn.calast_img read more

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Ancient war trail destroyed by pipeline company says Wetsuweten hereditary chief

first_imgPipeline company Coastal GasLink has bulldozed over an ancient war trail on Wet’suwet’en territory amid continued resistance from the Nation’s top hereditary leadership. Photo: Michael Toledano.Laurie HamelinAPTN NewsA pipeline company in B.C. has cleared an area of historical significance to the Wet’suwet’en Nation prior to completing mandatory provincial archaeological work near Kitimat.In a phone interview with APTN News, Na’Moks, the highest ranking chief of the Wet’suwet’en Nation’s Tsayu Clan, confirmed the ancient Kweese War Trail is located in his clan’s territory and has been partially impacted by workers on the Coastal GasLink pipeline.“The war was over the mountains with Kitimat, and when we won that war we took the crest and brought it home — we wear it on our backs,” he said.“During the training to get there, and on the way back in particular, our warriors died along that trail. How do we know that workers did not go over one of our gravesites?”Last month Coastal GasLink (CGL) announced that construction of its pipeline began in a number of places before approved Archaeological Impact Assessments (AIA) were finished, even though they are required to be in place prior to land disturbance.The company apologized to the impacted Indigenous communities and immediately suspended clearing work in the areas while an internal review and post-assessment is conducted.In a statement to APTN, CGL said they learned of the issues during an internal audit.“As part of routine quality assurance procedures, Coastal GasLink discovered that there were gaps in our Archaeological Impact Assessment coverage,” they wrote.“Once confirmed, CGL notified the BC Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) and BC Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) of the clearing and asked permission from the OGC to undertake a post-impact assessment of the areas to determine what, if any cultural or heritage values had been impacted.”The controversial natural gas pipeline will run 670 kilometres from Dawson Creek B.C. to a processing plant in Kitimat on the coast. There, the fracked gas will be liquefied and shipped to markets in Asia.All 20 First Nations along the pipeline route signed on with the project, but the Wet’suwet’en Nation’s highest hereditary chiefs don’t approve of the project.The hereditary chiefs say their traditional laws give them jurisdiction, not elected leadership.“This happened in the territory I am caretaker of,” said Na’Moks.Chief Na’Moks (left) and other hereditary Wet’suwet’en chiefs have taken a stand against the Coastal GasLink pipeline that is slated to run through unceded Wet’suwet’en territory. APTN file photo.The hereditary leaders of the Wet’suwet’en and Gitxsan Nations were the litigants in the land mark 1997 Supreme Court of Canada case Delgamuukw v. British Columbia, in which the SCC recognized the Wet’suwet’en traditional house and clan governance system.“Band councils, communities, they don’t have a say in this — the hereditary chiefs do,” Na’Moks continued. “And I want them to cease what they are doing.”Na’Moks recently visited the ancient war trail and says the area being cleared for the pipeline right of way is now destroyed.“They laid trees across the entire clearing and in some places they put matts over top,” he said.“One beside the other with no gaps. You can’t even go in for soil samples, make pits or do any kind of work.”But CGL confirmed corduroy matts were put in place to limit disturbance to the area. The pipeline company has not set a deadline for completion of the review, but is requesting Indigenous communities’ participation in the post-impact assessment.A cleared area of forest that Wet’suwet’en leaders say is part of an ancient war trail. Photo: Michael Toledano.“Post-impact means they have already ruined it,” said Na’Moks.“Government and industry cannot claim ignorance; we made them very aware of the trail and its significance. We wrote about it in reports back in 2014, it’s in all of our mapping, and we even ribboned it off, but they took our ribbons off the trees and knocked the trees down,” he continued.“The trail was mentioned in the Delgamuukw case.”“It seems like Indigenous rights, our culture, our spirits, where we get our names — all of our history — means nothing at this point.”lhamelin@aptn.ca@Laurie_Hamelinlast_img read more

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Brakes tapped on ride sharing in BC despite election promises to allow

first_imgVICTORIA – An election promise to bring ride sharing to British Columbia by the end of the year has taken a detour as the NDP government says safety of passengers and operators comes first.Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said Tuesday the government is studying safety and regulatory issues and she can’t say when ride-sharing operations like Uber and Lyft will come to the province.She said the government isn’t stalling.“It’s doing what we said we were going to do in the (election) platform and when we took over as government. We’re going to make sure passenger safety comes first,” said Trevena.The New Democrats and Liberals pledged to bring in ride sharing this year during last spring’s election.The NDP promised to “work with taxi drivers, taxi companies and ride-sharing companies to create a truly fair approach to ride sharing in B.C. that doesn’t unfairly benefit — or punish — one group over the other.”But Trevena now wouldn’t put a timeline on the promise.“We want to make sure whatever we’re doing, we’re doing it safely, we’re doing it judiciously,” she said. “We’re talking about people’s safety here.”Green Leader Andrew Weaver said B.C. can’t wait much longer, which is why he will introduce for a third time a private member’s bill to pave the way for ride sharing.He said the bill can spark debate this fall about the service, but neither the Liberals nor the NDP appear receptive.Liberal jobs critic Jas Johal said the Opposition has not been talking with the Greens about ride sharing and will have to fully examine the proposed bill before offering any kind of support.Trevena said the legislature is the proper venue to debate ride sharing, but the timing may be off despite Weaver’s efforts.Weaver said taking the slow approach on ride sharing signals B.C. is not willing to explore new technologies.“We will never be viewed as innovators if we are not willing to embrace innovation,” he said.Weaver said the NDP may fear a backlash from the taxi industry, but ride sharing represents the future.“What we need to do together is bring the legislation that enables change to occur in a manner that’s fair,” he said. “We don’t need to wait years to do so.”B.C. Taxi Association president Mohan Kang said the minority NDP government has committed to consult on ride sharing with stakeholders, including the taxi industry.“It is the responsibility of the government to ensure the public safety issue is addressed,” he said. “The B.C. Taxi Association has said since Day 1, since 2012, we don’t have any problem with technology networking companies coming to B.C., provided they come through the front door and meet the requirements of law.”The association represents about 140 taxi companies across B.C.Uber Canada spokeswoman Susie Heath said in a statement the company is monitoring ride sharing developments in B.C.“During the recent provincial election, all three parties, including the NDP, pledged to bring ride sharing to British Columbia by the end of 2017,” she said. “We encourage all parties to follow through on their election commitments to work together and make ride sharing a reality in 2017.”last_img read more

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Shopify shares drop as CEO addresses shortsellers allegations

first_imgVANCOUVER – Shopify Inc. reported a solid revenue increase, reached a crucial milestone a quarter earlier than anticipated and mounted a defence against “preposterous claims” by a “short-selling troll”, but failed to ease investor concerns Thursday as shares fell more than eight per cent.The Ottawa-based online store platform (TSX:SHOP) posted its first adjusted operating profit as a public company in its third quarter ended Sept. 30 as its revenue grew 72 per cent compared with the same period last year.Revenue for the company, which keeps its books in US dollars, totalled $171.5 million, up from $99.6 million. Shopify said it lost $9.4 million in its third quarter, amounting to nine cents per share. That compared with a loss of $9.1 million or 11 cents per share a year ago when it had fewer shares outstanding.In a call, CEO Tobias Lutke publicly addressed allegations by high-profile short-seller Andrew Left of Citron Research published earlier this month.“This is going to be a fun one,” Lutke said, explaining the company waited nearly a month to address the allegations because it does not engage in short-term stock management. Rather, he said, Shopify reserves time each quarter to update analysts on any news.However, Lutke’s remarks failed to reassure investors, who were looking for information on acquisition costs and “churn rate” that would contradict Left’s hypothesis that the company is overvalued. Shares plunged C$11.96 or 8.53 per cent to close at C$128.26.On Oct. 4, Left published a video alleging the company, which provides businesses with online checkout services, doesn’t comply with Federal Trade Commission guidelines and suggesting the stock’s value is closer to US$60 before any potential FTC involvement.He compared the company’s practices, which he called a “good ol’ get-rich-quick scheme,” to Herbalife, a direct-marketing company that a short-seller alleged was a pyramid scheme. The FTC investigated Herbalife and the company recently had to pay a US$200-million settlement and make structural changes.During the call, the CEO asserted the company sells an e-commerce platform — not business opportunities — and complies with FTC regulations.Much of their content shows how hard entrepreneurship is, he said.“Implying that these businesses are somehow illegitimate is an insult to their hard work,” said Lutke.Harley Finkelstein, the company’s chief operating officer, addressed concerns around the company’s affiliate partner program. In his video, Left identified several alleged Shopify partners attempting to woo future merchants with promises of self employment and million-dollar incomes.Shopify has a team that approves individual affiliate partners who sign an agreement outlining their disclosure responsibilities, Finkelstein said.“Those that don’t comply we simply kick out of the program,” he said, adding some of the alleged affiliates Left’s report alluded to are not partnered with Shopify.Lutke added that Shopify consulted with outside legal counsel, who also believe the claims are unsubstantiated, and has not been contacted by the FTC.Citron Research is “unimpressed” by the company’s response, it said in a statement, adding that it has forwarded a comprehensive folder of its allegations to the FTC.“It’s impossible to understand the real strength of Shopify’s core business without getting specifics of their true customer acquisition cost.”The company needs to release its churn figures — which indicate how many entrepreneurs stop using the platform — Citron Research claims, “so investors can discount or strip out the dirty/illegal part of their business that will inevitably be curbed by regulators.”For Shopify, “unit churn misrepresents the value of our business model,” said its chief financial officer Russ Jones. “We actually release our revenue retention number, which is just the other side of churn. It’s above 100 per cent per year.”Shopify’s stock is likely to experience about 90 to 100 days of choppy price action until the company provides 2018 guidance in about three months, wrote Richard Davis, an analyst with Canaccord Genuity Inc.Until then, Shopify shares “will likely drift with the winds of the overall market and whatever nonsense the shorts can conjure,” he said.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

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Top EU economic powers warn US about tax plans

first_imgBRUSSELS – The European Union’s top five economies are warning the United States that its massive tax overhaul could violate some of its international obligations and risks having “a major distortive impact” on trade.In a letter to U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, the finance ministers of Germany, France, Britain, Italy and Spain wrote they had “significant concerns” about three tax initiatives in particular.In the letter, seen by The Associated Press, the five wrote that “it is important that the U.S. government’s rights over domestic tax policy be exercised in a way that adheres with international obligations to which it has signed-up.”EU nations have been warily eyeing President Trump’s domestic tax proposals as they made their way through congress and have long expressed fears they might hurt world trade and EU companies in particular.“The inclusion of certain less conventional international tax provisions could contravene the U.S.’s double taxation treaties and may risk having a major distortive impact on international trade,” the five wrote.They specifically targeted the so-called Base Erosion and Anti-abuse Tax (or BEAT) Senate bill. This measure aims to combat what is called base erosion and profit shifting, the practice by some multinationals to avoid tax by exploiting mismatches in countries’ tax rules to artificially report their profits in countries with low or no taxes.The finance ministers lauded the measure’s aim to ensure companies pay their fair share in taxes to the U.S. But they said that under the current plans, the measures would also hurt genuine commercial deals. In the financial sector in particular, “the provision appears to have the potential of being extremely harmful for international banking and insurance business.”They said it “may lead to significant tax charges and may harmfully distort international financial markets.”The EU’s 28 finance ministers had already expressed concern about the U.S. plans during a meeting last week, but now its five biggest economies have gone ahead with their own warning.In Washington, Republicans are upbeat about finalizing the tax bill from the House and Senate versions for Trump’s first major legislative accomplishment in nearly 11 months in office.Trump has set a Christmas deadline for signing the bill into law, giving lawmakers named to a special conference committee two weeks to iron out major differences in the House and Senate versions of the legislation. The conference committee has scheduled its first formal meeting for Wednesday.Both measures would cut taxes by about $1.5 trillion over the next decade while adding billions to the $20 trillion deficit, combining steep tax cuts for corporations with more modest reductions for most individuals. Together, the changes would amount to the biggest overhaul of the U.S. tax system in 30 years, touching every corner of society.last_img read more

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Potbased medical pet products closer to fruition as research grows

first_imgCanadian pets are a few steps closer to getting their paws on pot-based medical treatments in Canada as more cannabis companies research marijuana’s efficacy for companion animals.Canopy Growth Corp. is the latest medical marijuana company to enter the potentially lucrative pet market with its announcement this week that it will embark on a Health Canada-approved clinical trial to research the use of cannabis-based products to treat animal anxiety.The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association’s national issues and animal welfare manager says there has been a flurry of cannabis-related pet research as Canada’s laws on recreational cannabis become clearer as the country prepares for legalization in October.Dr. Shane Renwick says its veterinarian members have gotten a lot of queries from clients looking for cannabis-based treatments for their pets’ ailments, such as pain, but there is no legal avenue for them to prescribe pot and not enough clinical evidence to support it.He says the association is hopeful that the government will eventually approve some cannabis-based veterinary health products that its members can prescribe for their pet clients, and each clinical trial approval brings them one step closer in the process.Canopy says it got the green light from the Veterinary Drug Directorate of Health Canada for its research into the use of cannabidiol, also known as CBD, enriched oil to treat anxiety in certain animals.last_img read more

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Key household debt ratio creeps higher in second quarter to 1691 per

first_imgOTTAWA – The amount households owe, relative to their income, crept higher in the second quarter, even as mortgage borrowing continued to slow, Statistics Canada said.The agency said Friday credit market debt as a proportion of household disposable income increased to 169.1 per cent as growth in debt outpaced income.In other words, Canadians owed $1.69 in credit market debt for every dollar of household disposable income.The ratio was up from 168.3 per cent in the first quarter, however it was down from 169.7 per cent in the second quarter last year.BMO Capital Markets economic analyst Priscilla Thiagamoorthy noted the increase was “well below seasonal norms” and one of the smallest second-quarter increases since 2000.“Despite edging slightly higher in Q2, the closely watched household debt-to-income ratio appears to have finally turned the corner from all-time highs,” Thiagamoorthy wrote in a brief report.“The key takeaway here is that borrowing cooled with the housing market as households adjusted to a slew of policy changes including tighter mortgage rules and gradual rate hikes.”Household debt has been identified as a key vulnerability for the financial system by the Bank of Canada, however the central bank noted earlier this year that the risk has lessened.On a seasonally adjusted basis, households borrowed $19.6 billion in the quarter, down from $22.2 billion in the previous quarter.The decrease came as demand for consumer credit increased, but was more than offset by a decline in both mortgage and non-mortgage loans.The decline in mortgages came as the housing market slowed amid tighter mortgage rules and rising mortgage rates.Rates for five-year fixed mortgages have been rising as yields on the bond markets, where the banks raise money, have also climbed higher.Meanwhile, rates charged for variable rate mortgages have also climbed as the Bank of Canada has raised its key interest rate target.On an unadjusted basis, household credit market debt, which includes consumer credit, and mortgage and non-mortgage loans, totalled $2.16 trillion.last_img read more

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Minnesota regulators reaffirm approval for Enbridge Line 3 pipeline

first_imgST. PAUL, Minn. — Minnesota regulators reaffirmed their support Monday for Enbridge Energy’s proposal to replace its aging Line 3 crude oil pipeline across the northern part of the state, while dozens of protesters walked out of the overflow hearing to make a point about climate change.The Public Utilities Commission unanimously rejected a motion by opponents to reconsider its previous decision to grant a certificate of need for the project. And the commissioners agreed that Calgary-based Enbridge has met several conditions that they imposed when they approved the plan in June.“Line 3 is a climate change disaster so we will stop Line 3,” several protesters in the main hearing room chanted early during the proceedings. Other opponents watching from an overflow room took up the chant and marched across the street to the Capitol, where they presented governor-elect Tim Walz’s staff with a recent gloomy UN report on climate change.But the hearing continued, unlike a previous PUC hearing on the same issues in September that commissioners postponed until Monday after protesters disrupted it. Monday’s hearing was held in the Minnesota Senate Building, which has larger hearing rooms than the PUC’s headquarters, and it’s secured by state troopers, who were out in force.The existing Line 3 was built in the 1960s and carries crude from Alberta to Enbridge’s terminal in Superior, Wis., clipping a corner of North Dakota along the way. It currently runs at about half its original capacity because it’s increasingly subject to corrosion and cracking. Enbridge says the replacement, which would follow a partly different route across Minnesota, will restore that capacity and ensure reliable deliveries of crude to Midwestern refineries.The approval is “good news for Alberta’s energy sector,” Premier Rachel Notely said in a Facebook post Monday.She said replacing the pipeline will “make it safer, more reliable and able to operate at full capacity.”“Construction on Line 3 is already complete in Wisconsin and has picked up in Canada — the section from Hardisty, Alta., to Kerrobert, Sask., is now almost 95 per cent complete, compared to 85 per cent on Oct. 1, 2018,” she said. “Two sections in Saskatchewan are already finished.”Notley added that Enbridge expects Line 3 to being operating in the second half of 2019.Environmental and Indigenous groups say the project would aggravate climate change, because crude from oilsands generates more carbon dioxide emissions, and that it would endanger pristine waters in northern Minnesota where Native Americans harvest wild rice and claim treaty rights.On a series of 5-0 votes, the commissioners agreed that Enbridge has largely met the conditions they attached to their earlier approval, including requirements for insurance coverage against spills and financial assurances for covering the costs of removing the pipeline at the end of its life. Enbridge agreed to secure $940 million in insurance coverage and cover any additional cleanup costs itself. The company estimates the clean-up costs of a worst-case-scenario rupture at $1.4 billion.The state Department of Commerce, which tried unsuccessfully to persuade the commission this summer that the project isn’t necessary, argued that Enbridge’s financial guarantees are inadequate, especially if the company should have to deal with more than one spill on its system at the same time. The rupture of a different Enbridge pipeline into the Kalamazoo River in Michigan in 2010 cost the company about $1.2 billion to clean up.“Enbridge has demonstrated its … capacity to have extraordinary losses anywhere on its system that could wipe out all insurance for its entire operations,” said Julia Anderson, an attorney for the department.Enbridge supporters, many of whom wore blue “Minnesotans for Line 3” winter caps, arrived early and outnumbered the opponents, who mostly had to settle for seats in the overflow room.Afterward, Nancy Noor, chairwoman of the Jobs for Minnesotans business-labour-community coalition, praised the commission for standing firm on its approval and letting the project move forward.Winona LaDuke, executive director of Honor the Earth, and other opponents vowed to press forward with appeals and protests.Steve Karnowski, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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MLA Davies returning to Fort St John Wednesday to heal from injuries

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Peace River North MLA Dan Davies says he’s going to be discharged from Vancouver General Hospital on Wednesday, just eight days after being seriously injured in a workplace incident in Fort St. John.Last Tuesday, Davies was injured in an incident at Inland Concrete in Fort St. John where he has worked on and off since 1995. The Peace River North MLA explained that he was offered a four-hour morning shift while meeting with the company’s owners during the three week break of the spring session of the BC Legislature.“As MLA, I think it was my second shift in a year,” said Davies. “ I would call it far from moonlighting.” He said that he had booked several days off to spend time with his family, and that the incident did not conflict with his duties as MLA. “This would be no different than if I were to go anywhere and get into an accident, or fall off my bike or while skiing,” clarifying that the sole difference is the involvement of Worksafe BC. Davies said that the accident at Inland occurred while he was putting together metal concrete forms, when he was struck by a jib and chain attachment that was installed on a front-end loader. He explained that the end of the jib struck Davies on the back and drove him into one of the forms. The cause of the incident is currently under investigation.When he picked up by BC Ambulance Service Paramedics, Davies was transported to the Fort St. John Hospital before being airlifted to Vancouver to receive further treatment. He said that he suffered from several cracked vertebrae, along with some issues to his kidneys.After receiving treatment in Vancouver for the past week, Davies said that his doctors told him after lunch today that due to his rapid progress in recovering so far, he’ll be getting discharged from Vancouver General Hospital on Wednesday before flying back to Fort St. John that night. Davies added that he’ll be spending the time to heal properly at home for the next few weeks, and hopes to be back in the Legislature by next month.last_img read more

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Canadian Utilities selling Canadian fossil fuel based power assets

first_imgThe sales do not include Ashcor Technologies, the Oldman River Hydro Facility or any international projects.Canadian Utilities says that following the sales it will have approximately 250 megawatts of electricity generation assets in Canada, Mexico and Australia.The company, which is an Atco Ltd. subsidiary, says the sale concludes a strategic evaluation announced last year. CALGARY, A.B. – Canadian Utilities Ltd. says it has signed agreements to sell its entire Canadian fossil fuel-based electricity generation portfolio for approximately $835 million.Under a deal with Heartland Generation Ltd., an affiliate of Energy Capital Partners, the company will sell 11 partly or fully owned natural gas-fired and coal-fired electricity generation assets in Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario.Canadian Utilities has also signed an agreement to sell its 50-per-cent stake in the Cory Cogeneration Station near Saskatoon to SaskPower International.last_img read more

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