GrapheneBased Nanomat Could Lead to NextGeneration Catalysts

first_imgReduced graphene oxide (RGO) can serve as a catalyst mat by anchoring particles that carry out catalysis at different sites. Image credit: Prashant V. Kamat. (PhysOrg.com) — Researchers have found a new use for graphene, the single-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms that resembles chicken wire. Ever since graphene was first observed in 2004, its large surface area, excellent mechanical strength, and high electrical conductivity have intrigued scientists and opened up new areas of exploration. — “Anchoring Semiconductor and Metal Nanoparticles on a Two-Dimensional Catalyst Mat. Storing and Shuttling Electrons with Reduced Graphene Oxide.” Ian V. Lightcap, Thomas H. Kosel, and Prashant V. Kamat. Nano Letters. DOI:10.1021/nl9035109– “Graphene-Based Nanoarchitectures. Anchoring Semiconductor and Metal Nanoparticles on a Two-Dimensional Carbon Support.” PraDOI:10.1021/jz900265je Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. DOI:10.1021/jz900265j In their recent study, Ian Lightcap, Thomas Kosel, and Prashant Kamat of the University of Notre Dame have demonstrated that graphene can be used as a multifunctional catalyst mat. As a catalyst mat, two-dimensional graphene can hold particles that act as catalysts to speed up or slow down the rate of chemical reactions. The findings may pave the way for the development of next-generation catalyst systems, as well as advances in chemical and biological sensors. The study is published in a recent issue of Nano Letters.“The obvious challenge [in constructing a catalyst mat] is to have a large area of carbon surface so that the catalyst particles can be dispersed without any aggregation,” Kamat told PhysOrg.com. “Graphene, with its two-dimensional nanostructure, provides the largest surface area to anchor catalyst particles.”In addition to its large surface area, a graphene communicating platform also has the ability to store and transfer electrons to different locations on the platform due to its redox properties. Taking advantage of these properties, the researchers used electron transfer processes to anchor two different catalyst particles – semiconductor nanoparticles (titanium dioxide) and metal nanoparticles (silver) – to the mat. As the researchers explain, having two different catalyst particles in different locations on the same sheet can provide greater versatility for carrying out catalytic processes.To construct the catalyst system, photogenerated electrons in titanium dioxide nanoparticles are first transferred into the graphene oxide substrate. Some of these electrons are used to improve the conductivity of the substrate, turning the graphene oxide into reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Meanwhile, other electrons are stored in the RGO sheet until the introduction of silver nitrate. At this point, the stored electrons are transported across the RGO sheet to reduce the silver ions into silver nanoparticles, which serve as seeds for additional growth.“The graphene sheet facilitates direct communication between different particles by shuttling electrons across the carbon plane,” Kamat said. “The growth of silver nanoparticles confirms the ability of the graphene sheet as an electronic communicating platform between semiconductor and metal nanoparticles anchored on the graphene sheet. … One can envisage depositing other catalyst nanoparticles to incorporate additional selectivity.” One example that Kamat noted is a water-splitting catalyst system, in which molecular oxygen and hydrogen are generated at separate catalyst sites. Explore further A Search for Stability for Platinum Catalystscenter_img Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Graphene-Based Nanomat Could Lead to Next-Generation Catalysts (2010, January 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-graphene-based-nanomat-next-generation-catalysts.html More information: This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Controlling the interaction between light and matter

first_img Citation: Controlling the interaction between light and matter (2010, April 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-04-interaction.html (PhysOrg.com) — “One of the most exciting things about this is that it gives us nice, clean control over the interaction between light and matter,” William Kelly tells PhysOrg.com. “Our technique has the potential to give delicate and precise control over how artificial atoms interact with photons.” Kelly is with Raytheon BBN Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Along with a group of others in BBN’s Disruptive Information Processing Technologies division, and with scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, Kelly took part in an experiment designed to observe superposition of states in a superconducting artificial atom. The group’s results are described in Physical Review Letters: “Direct Observation of Coherent Population Trapping in a Superconducting Artificial Atom.”“In a classical physics, an atom is in only one energy level at a time, referred to as 0, 1, or 2. In quantum mechanics, though, you get superposition states, in which the exact energy of the atom is not well defined,” Kelly explains. “In similar experiments, you see a lot of two-state interference. Our experiment, though, showed three-state interference. This is a new effect in these kinds of systems.”To get this effect, Kelly and his colleagues worked with microwaves. “In atomic experiments, this type of thing is done with optical frequencies,” he says. “At room temperature it wouldn’t be feasible to use microwaves because of thermal noise, however at the temperatures we work at thermal noise is not a problem.” The experiment involved super-cooling a tiny superconducting device, which acts as an artificial atom, to less than one tenth of a degree above absolute zero. “You apply microwaves to this system, coupling an electromagnetic field to the device, and use that to control the state the artificial atom is in. By sending in photons with energies that match the energy gap of the artificial atom, it is possible to get the artificial atom to transition states,” Kelly says.One of the potential applications of this technique is in quantum information processing. “There are different possible platforms for realizing quantum information systems. Superconducting artificial atoms and photons are both candidates with their own advantages and disadvantages,” Kelly points out. “With this technique, we could potentially use the best of both worlds for quantum information processing.” He also points out that there has been a great deal of work done with optical switching, and that down the road this technique could lead to similar work with switching done with microwave frequencies. “We could use this as a sort of microwave transistor.”On a fundamental level, this work could lead to increased knowledge of quantum systems, and the use of artificial atoms. “This is the first time we’ve seen coherence in three states in a manmade system,” Kelly says. “Additionally, there are interesting possibilities for using this to slow microwaves down, or even stop them.”Further development is some while down the road, Kelly acknowledges, but there are some interesting opportunities available now. “We’re probably close to using this to demonstrate slow light,” he says. “However, there are a bunch of possible applications. With more study of this system, we should be able to figure out some new ways to advance technology.” Explore further More information: W.R. Kelly, Z. Dutton, J. Schlafer, B. Mookerji, T.A. Ohki, J.S. Kline, and D.P. Pappas, “Direct Observation of Coherent Population Trapping in a Superconducting Artificial Atom,” Physical Review Letters (2010). Available online: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.163601center_img Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Yale scientists bring quantum optics to a microchiplast_img read more

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Samsung NC215 solar netbook arrives in Korea

first_img Asus 1000HE Netbook Claims 9.5 Hour Battery Life (PhysOrg.com) — Samsung has released the NC215 solar-powered netbook in Korea. The netbook carries a solar panel on the lid, which can turn two hours of sunlight into one hour of netbook run-time. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Samsung NC215 solar netbook arrives in Korea (2011, August 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-samsung-nc215-solar-netbook-korea.html © 2011 PhysOrg.comcenter_img Users in developing countries and in fact all trekkers who depend on mobile computing have been already targeted via release of the netbook in Europe, Africa and America. The NC215 carries the following specs: a 10.1 inch, 1024 x 600 pixels, 1.66 GHz Intel Atom N570 dual core processor, 1GB DDR3 memory, and, 250GB 5400 RPM hard drive. a matte screen, 802.11 b / g / n WiFi, Bluetooth 3.0, an SDHC card reader, VGA and Ethernet, and 3 USB ports, including one that can be used to charge cell phone devices even when the computer is turned off. The model comes with Windows 7 Starter Edition.One of the talking points has been its “Fast Start” function. The PC saves the current state and enters sleep mode when the cover is closed. It takes three seconds to wake up the PC from sleep mode. Also, the solar panel can be used to charge smartphones even when the PC is powered off or is in power-saving mode.In the bigger picture, the solar netbook debut is yet another advancement for Samsung as a prominent global player in solar technologies. Samsung has taken up the challenge to demonstrate if and how solar PV cells can power more than homes. EE Times Asia lists Samsung as the solar patent king. The company stands out in its explorations into ways to provide inexpensive cells in high volume, says a report from Semiconductor Insights. Explore further The Samsung NC215 solar netbooklast_img read more

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Researchers extend galvanic replacement reactions to metal oxide nanocrystals

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org) —A large team of researchers, most of which are based in Korea, has succeeded in extending the process of galvanic replacement reactions to ionic compounds. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes how they used preformed nanocrystals to serve as a template to produce hollow box-shaped nanocrystals. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Monitoring the transformation of silver nanowires into gold nanotubes with in situ transmission X-ray microscopy Citation: Researchers extend galvanic replacement reactions to metal oxide nanocrystals (2013, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-galvanic-reactions-metal-oxide-nanocrystals.html Play Movie showing transformation of Mn3 O4 nanocrystals to γ-Fe2 O3 nanocages via galvanic replacement reaction. Credit: Taeghwan Hyeon To cause the galvanic replacement process to work with ionic compounds, the researchers used redox-couple reactions between multivalent metallic ions. More specifically, when they caused manganese oxide nanocrystals to react with iron percholate, a new type of nanocrystal was created in the form of hollow shaped boxes which eventually evolved into hollow crystals that resembled cages. Because of their shape, the researchers dubbed them “nanocages.” The process works because higher-oxidation state ions in manganese are naturally replaced by lower-oxidation state ions in the solution.The team’s results demonstrate that ionic compounds can be easily and cheaply used as templates to create new and useful nanocrystal-based materials. Further research, they suggest, is likely to lead to nanomaterials creations that are limited only by the imagination. For now, the researchers suggest the new type of nanocrystals might be useful in a wide variety of applications ranging from energy production, to biotechnology and electronics, and perhaps even as an anode material for lithium ion batteries.center_img Image showing γ-Fe2 O3 nanocages. Credit: Taeghwan Hyeon] Journal information: Science In the early days of nanomaterial research, chemists built environments for the creation of new nanocrystal-based materials using the proper mix of solvents, surfactants and molecular precursors. They then experimented with ways to cause the atoms in the mix to self assemble into the desired shape. More recently, researchers have found that a better way is to use preformed nanocrystals to serve as a template for the creation of new materials. Adding chemicals causes them to be changed in desired ways resulting in nanoparticles with unique properties. With metal nanocrystals, atomic exchange reactions can be brought about by taking advantage of the reduced potential differences between a metal in a template and metal ions in a solution—a method known as galvanic replacement. At its base, it’s a process of atomic diffusion—atoms are caused to move away from a structure, creating vacancies. Until now, however, this method has been limited to metals. In this new effort, the galvanic replacement process is extended to ionic compounds. More information: Galvanic Replacement Reactions in Metal Oxide Nanocrystals, Science 24 May 2013: Vol. 340 no. 6135 pp. 964-968 DOI: 10.1126/science.1234751AbstractGalvanic replacement reactions provide a simple and versatile route for producing hollow nanostructures with controllable pore structures and compositions. However, these reactions have previously been limited to the chemical transformation of metallic nanostructures. We demonstrated galvanic replacement reactions in metal oxide nanocrystals as well. When manganese oxide (Mn3O4) nanocrystals were reacted with iron(II) perchlorate, hollow box-shaped nanocrystals of Mn3O4/γ-Fe2O3 (“nanoboxes”) were produced. These nanoboxes ultimately transformed into hollow cagelike nanocrystals of γ-Fe2O3 (“nanocages”). Because of their nonequilibrium compositions and hollow structures, these nanoboxes and nanocages exhibited good performance as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. The generality of this approach was demonstrated with other metal pairs, including Co3O4/SnO2 and Mn3O4/SnO2. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Turning an organic molecule into a coherent twolevel quantum system

first_img “Organic molecules have been studied and applied in various contexts for many decades,” Vahid Sandoghdar, the head of the research team, told Phys.org. “Our research group has been interested in using them in quantum optical measurements, which have traditionally been done on atoms in a vacuum chamber.” Sandoghar and his colleagues found that an organic molecule placed into an optical microcavity actually behaves as a coherent two-level quantum system. This enabled the researchers to extinguish 99% of a laser beam with a single molecule.The remarkable efficiency of this interaction also meant that they could saturate a molecule by about only 0.5 photon, whereas one usually requires a considerable amount of power to achieve saturation. The nonlinear nature of this effect was also manifested in non-classical generation of a few-photons of super-bunched light.”The great advantage of our system is that a single molecule sits at exactly the same place in its surrounding crystal for days and weeks, whereas a single atom is usually kept on time scales of the order of seconds only,” said Daqing Wang, who did his doctoral research on this project. “Quantum mechanical systems are building blocks of the emerging field of quantum engineering, but they can easily lose their quantumness,” Sandoghdar said. “The dream is to wire up many quantum mechanical systems in a way that their fragile quantum mechanical interactions are preserved. Our work shows that an organic molecule, which is usually associated with fluorescence microscopy in biology or with colors of a T-shirt, can do what one expects from an ideal quantum mechanical system.” In the future, the study carried out by the team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute could enable the development of linear and nonlinear quantum photonic circuits based on organic platforms. “What we have shown so far is that we can really interact a single photon with a single molecule in an efficient manner,” Sandoghdar said. “We are now working on doing that on a chip and then extending it to a quantum photonic circuit, where many molecules are connected via nanoscopic waveguides.” Single molecules show promise to optically detect single electrons © 2019 Science X Network The effect of a single molecule on the cavity’s transmission spectrum. The cavity frequency was tuned across the molecular frequency (1-12). When the molecule is on resonance with the cavity (see 7, 8), it blocks completely the transmission of the cavity, i.e., it works as a nearly perfect mirror. Credit: Wang et al. Researchers at Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light and Friedrich Alexander University in Erlangen, Germany have recently demonstrated that a molecule can be turned into a coherent two-level quantum system. In their study, published in Nature Physics, they placed an organic molecule inside an optical microcavity and found that it behaved as a coherent two-level quantum system. Credit: Dominik Rattenbacher This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further An individual molecule has several vibrational energy levels, which provide multiple decay channels for its excited state. To turn a molecule into a two-level quantum system, the researchers had to speed up one of these transitions to such an extent that the molecule’s decay rate to the other levels would become negligible. In other words, this process prevented the molecule from decaying to levels that the researchers did not want it to go to. “To make this happen, we have enclosed the molecule in a cavity consisting of two mirrors separated by a very small distance in the order of one micrometer,” Wang explained. “The transition of choice is resonant with the cavity so that a photon can go back and forth many times, in our case several thousand times.” The researchers carried out their experiment at about 2 Kelvin, to ensure that thermal agitations of the crystal didn’t affect its interaction with the laser light. In addition to showing that a molecule can act as a coherent two-level quantum system, they demonstrated that their molecule-microcavity system could interact with single photons generated by a second molecule in a distant laboratory. Citation: Turning an organic molecule into a coherent two-level quantum system (2019, March 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-molecule-coherent-two-level-quantum.html Journal information: Nature Physics More information: Daqing Wang et al. Turning a molecule into a coherent two-level quantum system, Nature Physics (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41567-019-0436-5last_img read more

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Capitals real tryst with reel at DIAF

first_imgDelhi is buzzing with the ongoing Delhi International Arts Festival (DIAF). And now Delhiites get a festival for film lovers.The film festival will bring together both national and international films from countries like Columbia, Cuba, France, Tajikistan, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Lebanon, Venezuela, Taiwan, Kazakhstan, Costa Rica, Poland, Kyrgystan, Ecuador and El Salvador to the Capital’s audience.The films that will be featured in the Indian section will bring about the golden era of Indian cinema with classics from languages like Hindi, Malayalam, Telugu, Marathi, Kannada, Bengali, Tamil, Punjabi and Assamese to be screened. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’There would be a total 38 feature films — a mix of 19 Indian and 19 international films. Some of the Indian  classical movies which will be screened are Raja Harishchandra, Umrao Jaan, Jhanak Jhanak Payal Baje, Devdas, Kagaaz ke phool which will give a glimpse of the early Bollywood film history.For instance, Umrao Jaan takes us back to Faizabad during British India,  where a young girl falls victim  to vengeance and is sold to a brothel and renamed Umrao Jaan. It takes a detour of the Indian society at large of a brave young woman who wants to go back to her family. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixKagaz Ke Phool tells the story of the world of cinema which destroys both the sanity of a man and his family and how it comes to a full circle when he returns as an extra in the movie where the leading lady is someone who had destroyed his life.The classic Devdas is a story of love and of realisation of love which ends with pain and death.Zubeidaa is the story of Riyaz’s search to find his mother. His mother, Zubeidaa, secretly acted in films but when her father found out, he forbade her to carry on and quickly arranged her marriage to Mehboob Alam. A misunderstanding arose between Suleman Seth and Mehboob’s parents, and Mehboob divorced Zubeidaa few days after she gave birth.Zubeidaa is the story of a Riyaz’s finding  and understanding his mother Zubeidaa who  goes through a whirlwind of emotional turbulences before her own death. Rudali, another classic, is about a woman who loses everything but yet she is unable to break into tears. As life goes on, ultimately she cries but what makes her cry is worth watching. Then there are movies like Sagara Sangamam, Mayuri and Sankarabharanam in Telegu; Nottam, Kaliyattom in Malayalam; Harishchandrachi Factory in Marathi; Bhakta Kanakadasa, Hamsa Geethe in Kannada; Zubeidaa and Rudali in Hindi; Moner Manush in Bengali; Thillana Mohanambal in Tamil; Waris Shah in Punjabi and Aideu in Assamese which make up the the regional section.Among the international flicks  to be screened  are Fat, Short And Bald Man from Columbia; The Booby Prize from Cuba; Van Gogh from France; The Telegram from Tajikistan; The Student from Mexico; Chance, The Watercolourist from Panama; What’s Going On from Lebanon; Everlasting Moments from Taiwan, I Like It from Bolivarian Republic Of Venezuela; Talgat from Kazakhstan; The Return from Costa Rica; Maria In Nobody’s Land from El Salvador; 1809-1810 While The Day Comes from Ecuador and Princess Nazik from Poland.DETAILAt: Indian Film Festival: Siri Fort Auditorium I. International Film Festival: Siri Fort Auditorium II On till: 10 November Timings: 2 pm onwardslast_img read more

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An insight into the Buddhist world

first_imgIndia International Centre is hosting the exhibition titled Architecture of the Buddhist World: Southeast Asia by Vikram Lall. The show is a study of architecture shaped by philosophy and practice of Buddhism in Southeast Asia. It presents a comprehensive survey of the diversity and complexity of architectural models and drawings with three dimensional renditions, supported by original photography.The exhibition traces the evolution of architectural form and spaces in response to changing ideas, material realities, and building traditions of Southeast Asia. Taking an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, it brings together art, architecture, archaeology, history, religion and philosophy to understand how Buddhist thought and ritual interacted with local traditions to produce distinctive architectural forms. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Buddhist monuments from six Southeast Asian countries, Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Vietnam and Thailand are included such as Pitaka Taik in MynmarSukothai in Thailand, Wat Mai in Laos, Mot Cot in Vietnam, Neak Pean in Cambodia, and Candi Sewu in Indonesia.A book discussion program on Architecture of the Buddhist World: The Golden Lands by Vikram Lall was held on June 12. The discussion was chaired by Dr Kapila Vatsayayan, art scholar, historian and the Chairperson of IIC Asia Project. Other panelists of the book discussion were Dr Lokesh Chandra, President, Indian Council for Cultural Relations, Dr Subhash C Malik, Retd UGC Professor, Prof Nalini Thakur, School of Planning and Architecture, and  Shyam Saran (Ex-foreign secretary), Chairman, Research & Information System for Developing countries. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixVatsyayan said, “Going through these images one goes through many centuries and many lands where Buddhism flourished”. She congratulated Mr Lall on his remarkable insight.Dr Chandra, an authority on Buddhist history said, “I don’t look at these as architectural structures, but believe in the vedic concept of chitti, which means placing one brick over the other in an ascending manner, thus reaching spiritual heights.”  Lall in his address noted, “My focus in this research was the change and development in the architecture of Buddhist monuments.” He stressed that his research work gives an analysis of the geographical and historical details associated with these temples and he also focussed on the various Buddhist concepts.The first in the series Architecture of the Buddhist World represents a new multidisciplinary approach showing how Buddhist thoughts and rituals have interacted with local traditions across the Asian continent to produce masterpieces of religious architecture. It reveals the history, styles, and interpretation of Buddhist temples, monasteries, and ancient monuments in Southeast Asian countries. When: On till June 19Where: India International Centrelast_img read more

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ExIPS officer Bharati Ghosh declared absconder

first_imgKolkata: The state Criminal Investigation Department (CID) on Friday submitted a charge-sheet against former IPS officer Bharati Ghosh marking her as an absconder along with eight others at Ghatal court in West Midnapore. Apart from Ghosh, her bodyguard Sujit Mondal has also been shown as an absconder in the charge-sheet.According to a senior official of the state CID, all those named in the charge-sheet has been slapped with cases including forgery, extortion and Prevention of Corruption Act. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe CID has already arrested six persons in this connection including four police officials — former Circle Inspector of Ghatal Subhankar Dey, former Officer-in-Charge of Daspur police station Pradip Rath, former OC of Ghatal Chitta Pal and Assistant Sub-Inspector Debasish Das.A businessman from Ghatal, Bimal Gharai and caretaker of Ghosh’s flat at Madurdaha in Kolkata, Rajmangal Singh have also been arrested.It may be mentioned that the state CID had taken up the case on basis of a complaint of extortion and criminal conspiracy at Daspur police station on February 1 by a gold trader named Chandan Majhi against certain police officers in the district who were close to former superintendent of West Midnapore Bharati Ghosh. Also Read – Naihati: 10 councillors return to TMC from BJPThe CID sleuths in the charge-sheet have also mentioned the huge amount of cash and gold jewellery that was recovered from a series of raids at flats owned by Ghosh and opening of lockers from a nationalised bank branch in Kolkata during the course of the investigation.The investigators, however, have remained tight-lipped about whether the charge-sheet figures the name of Bharati’s husband MAV Raju, who has been granted anticipatory bail by Calcutta High Court. The sleuths had questioned Raju in connection with this case on more than one occasion.The charge-sheet states that gold was taken from traders assuring a high rate of return after demonetisation of high-value notes was announced.last_img read more

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Adult leopard escapes from Bengali Safari Park in Siliguri

first_imgDarjeeling: Sachin chose the first day of the year for his great escape. Sachin, the adult leopard escaped from his enclosure at Bengali Safari near Siliguri on Tuesday triggering panic among visitors.During the routine check at around 8 am in the morning, the safari authorities found a leopard missing. There were four leopards in the safari. Closer scrutiny revealed that Sachin was missing. By this time, thousands of visitors had already lined up in front of the ticket counters. The Park was immediately shut down. Refunds were made to those who had procured tickets online. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe four leopards used to roam in a 20-hectare enclosure. The enclosure has 12 feet tall electric fencing. In order to make the fencing higher, tin sheets have been used on top of the electric fences. Some employees of the Safari Park claim Sachin had climbed a tree and from the highest branch of the tree had leaped across the fence. They had then alerted the authorities. A combing operation ensued with notices put up on all gates declaring the Safari Park shut. In the afternoon, personnel of the forest department found clues that suggested Sachin was hiding in the adjacent herbivore enclosure. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedImmediately, a search operation ensued. Forest squads were brought in from Darjeeling, Baikanthapur, Gorumara, Malbazar to conduct the search along with leopard experts. Two trained elephants of the Forest department have also been pressed into service. However, till the report was filed, Sachin remained untraceable. Search operations are on using vehicles. Around 15 cages have been set up inside the 91-hectare herbivore enclosure. “We hope to capture the leopard soon. The leopard has not attacked any animal or person till now,” stated Rajendra jakhar, Director of the Park. Bengal Safari Park will open on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Indian theatres strength lies in its diversity

first_img“W e have Kalidas, Maha Kavi Bhasa, Rabindranath Tagore, Vijay Tendulkar, Girish Karnad, Mohan Rakesh, Badal Sarkar, then why is it that the world is still unaware of Indian theatre,” asked Prof. Waman Kendre, director of National School of Drama, New Delhi, in an interview with Millennium post. He says that as a society and country, we never promoted and projected Indian theatre on a global level like the Britisher’s did with Shakespeare or the German’s did with Bertolt Brecht. “These playwrights beat the flow of time because of the quality of their writing but it was society as a whole who took the initiative of projecting them on a global level. This is exactly what we want to do for Indian theatre through the ongoing Theatre Olympics,” said Kendre. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfHosted for the first time in India by the National School of Drama, under the aegis of Ministry of Culture, Government of India, the 51-day-long nationwide, 8th Theatre Olympics is happening for the first time in India – presenting the finest productions of well-known theatre practitioners from around the world, till April 8. The Theatre Olympics was established in 1993 in Delphi, Greece, on the initiative of the famous Greek theatre director, Theodoros Terzopoulos. Since 1993, the Theatre Olympics has been held seven times in the following countries: Greece (1995), Japan (1999), Russia (2001), Turkey (2006), South Korea (2010), China (2014), and Poland (2016). And this year, after constant efforts put in by the National School of Drama, the theatre extravaganza has been brought to 17 cities of India with 450 shows, 600 ambience performances and 250 power packed youth forum shows with the participation of 25,000 artists from the globe. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive8th Theatre Olympics is in its second phase now and Prof Kendre is elated by the response. “In every city, people are rushing to watch the plays and in every play, the auditorium is jam-packed. In India, we don’t have much communication amongst ourselves but for this extravaganza, at least a thousand productions from different states and cultures applied. Even Theodoros, our international chairman, was amazed after watching our plays. We also have master classes, seminars, workshops with legendary people of the theatre industry to come and interact with audiences almost every day,” proudly said the director, who wished to host at least 1000 shows but couldn’t, due to financial restraints and other pressures. There was a time when theatre was the main source of entertainment but slowly it lost its space to TV, commercial movies, and of course, internet. But the academician, who has been in this field for at least 30 years now, says that no matter which medium comes, theatre is the mother of all arts and won’t ever lose its deserved space in our culture. “Theatre is live entertainement, karne wala aur dekhne wala aamne samne hoga tab theatre hoga,” asserted Kendre. He further said, “It is a medium of education, transformation, sensitizing youth, making healthy and positive citizens, making people aware about sensitive subjects, a medium which disturbs you because there are so many subjects which you should get disturbed about, and also, a medium of entertainment. It is a medium of purifying your soul. People will run to the mediums which gives them more money and glamour, but some don’t, they will always come back to their stage. Lack of infrastructure and facilities is a huge drawback for numerous theatre artists but in the end, theatre connects with people like no other medium. It is a live medium after all, and its strength lies in its liveliness.”8th Theatre Olympics is a proof that even India can host a magnum-opus festival with as much efficiency as Russia, China, Japan and Korea. “Since the last three years, I have been listening people say that India can’t host such a huge festival but ultimately, NSD will make India reach to a level where we will be able to say that even we can do such a thing, we can also host world’s biggest festival. When we theatre practitioners get that confidence then theatre will start vibrating,” resolved Kendre.He ended the note by saying that the world has always learned from Indian theatre and vice-versa. “We have classical theatre, folk, modern, tribal, musical, post-modern and ultra-modern theatre – it’s an endless list. We just need to promote its diversity on a global level and the world will follow us.”last_img read more

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