Euronav to Take Full Control of VLCC VK Eddie

first_imgzoom Antwerp-based tanker owner and operator Euronav NV has reached an agreement to buy out its 50% joint venture partner for full control of the 2005-built Very Large Crude Carrier (VLCC) V.K. Eddie.Euronav will buy the 305,261 dwt vessel from the joint venture company Oak Maritime (Canada) Inc. at a price of USD 39 million and will receive back 50% of the proceeds.Under the agreement reached between the parties, the Daewoo-built vessel would be delivered for full control to Euronav in mid-November.“This is a logical move for both parties. It permits Euronav to further simplify our financial and operating structure. In addition, it reiterates our positive view on the medium-term outlook for the tanker sector by actively increasing our capacity at what, we believe, are attractive asset prices,” Hugo De Stoop, CFO, said.Earlier this week, Euronav reported that its net profit for the third quarter of 2016 plunged to USD 0.1 million from USD 72.2 million reported in the same period a year earlier.The company said that seasonal freight rate weakness compounded by vessel supply factors marked the third quarter.“Freight rates were lower during the third quarter with anticipated seasonal weakness throughout the quarter compounded by higher levels of less favored vessel supply from several sources affecting tanker owners pricing behavior,” Paddy Rodgers, CEO of Euronav, said.last_img read more

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US CBP Withdraws Proposed Changes to Jones Act

first_imgzoom US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has withdrawn the proposed modifications to the country’s Jones Act which regulates maritime commerce in US waters and between US ports.The changes, which were presented on January 18, 2017 by President Barack Obama’s administration, would have revoked waivers that helped oil and gas operators to stay in line with restrictions, Reuters cited US Customs and Border Protection’s data.CBP said that, based on the comments received on the matter, both supporting and opposing the proposed action, and CBP’s further research on the issue, “we conclude that the agency’s notice of proposed modification and revocation of the various ruling letters relating to the Jones Act should be reconsidered.”The agency added that the move, relating to customs application of Jones Act to the transportation of certain merchandise and equipment between coastwise points, came info effect on May 10.Following the announcement, the American Petroleum Institute (API) welcomed CBP’s action, describing the proposed modifications as “harmful new Jones Act rulings.” “A recent report projected that this proposal could have resulted in the loss of thousands of American jobs, reduced U.S. oil and natural gas production, and diminished revenues for federal and state government,” Erik Milito, API Upstream Director, said.“By rescinding the proposal, CBP has decided not to impose potentially serious limitations to the industry’s ability to safely, effectively, and economically operate,” Milito added.last_img read more

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Six Die after Shipyard Blast in Cartagena

first_imgzoom Six persons died and at least 15 people sustained injuries following a huge explosion at Cotecmar shipyard in Cartagena, Colombia that occurred in the morning hours of May 17.Cotecmar said in a statement that 15 people were injured, while local media reported that the number could be as high as 23.A total of three explosions were reported in the industrial zone of Mamonal, located some 15 kilometers from the city, hitting Cotecmar and US shipyard Astivik.The blast at the yard occurred when a barge under maintenance at Cotecmar facilities at Mamonal exploded, according to the company.The shipyard, specializing in construction of naval platforms, and the repair and maintenance of vessels, expressed its condolences to the victims’ families on its twitter account.Queremos agradecer a todas las personas que se han solidarizado con la familia Cotecmar. Elevamos una oración por nuestros compañeros.— COTECMAR (@COTECMAR) May 18, 2017 The country’s police and naval authorities conducted an initial inspection of the site, once the fires were put under control, ruling out the possibility that an explosive device had caused the explosions. Further activities on determining the cause of the blasts are underway.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Astomos Elgas to Study LPG as Ship Bunker Fuel

first_imgzoom Japan’s Astomos Energy Corporation and Australian LPG distributor Elgas have agreed to further study the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as ship bunker fuel.Under a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the companies will enhance cooperation across all aspects of LPG bunkering including the sharing of information, research and development and collaboration in securing global supply sites for LPG bunkering within the Asia Pacific.The agreement is set to strengthen the relationship between the two companies in the field of seaborne LPG trading and contribute to the expansion into new business areas.Earlier in 2017, Astomos signed a separate MOU with Norway-based oil and gas company Statoil for the same purposes, to study the application of LPG as bunker fuel.LPG bunkering concept was shaped as one of the solutions for the approaching SOx Regulation for shipping fuels in 2020.last_img read more

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Seatankers Management Orders LNG Carrier at DSME

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: DSME Seatankers Management Company, part of Fredriksen Group, has inked a deal with Korean Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) for the construction of an LNG carrier.The ship will feature 173,400 cbm capacity and will be equipped with M-type, Electronically Controlled, Gas Injection (MEGI) engine and full re-liquefaction system (FRS).The ship will be built at the Okpo Shipyard and will be delivered in 2020.This is the 12th LNG carrier order to be placed at DSME this year bringing the shipbuilder’s total orderbook to 28 ships for 2018.The contract is being announced just days after DSME received an order from Greek billionaire John Anthony Angelicoussis for his 100th vessel at the yard.The 173,400 cbm floating, storage and regasification unit (FSRU), ordered for Angelicoussis’ Maran Gas Maritime brand, is slated for delivery in the first half of 2021.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Transocean to Merge with Ocean Rig in USD 27 Bn Deal

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Deepwater Horizon Response/Flickr under CC BY-ND 2.0 Consolidation in the offshore energy industry is gaining ground, the latest candidates to combine their strenghts being Transocean and Ocean Rig.The companies said on September 4 that they entered into a definitive merger agreement under which Transocean will acquire Ocean Rig in a cash and stock transaction valued at approximately USD 2.7 billion, inclusive of Ocean Rig’s net debt.“The purchase of Ocean Rig is in line with Transocean’s strategy to have the number one fleet of premium ultra-deepwater and harsh environment rigs,” Leslie Cook, principal analyst, upstream supply chain, at Wood Mackenzie, said.“The announcement is not a surprise. Industry consolidation is necessary to get these premium assets back to work over the next two to three years. The Ocean Rig fleet aligns very well with Transocean’s best-in-class portfolio.”Upon completion of the merger, Transocean’s and Ocean Rig’s shareholders will own approximately 79% and approximately 21%, respectively, of the combined company.The combined fleet with be comprised of 57 floaters, with 17 of the top 50 and 31 of the top 100 ultra-deepwater drillships in the industry. “It is Wood Mackenzie’s view that the premium ultra-deepwater drillship market has reached the bottom and rates for some of the highest-spec assets have the potential to double in the next couple years as active utilisation begins to tighten,” Cook said.“Operators are already demonstrating a preference for newer rigs that offer greater efficiency in their drilling programmes. As rates begin to float back up, the need to keep drilling costs down will drive demand for these newer rigs that can offer efficiency gains.”Expected annual cost synergies from the merger range around USD 70 million.“By buying Ocean Rig, Transocean is positioning itself to offer the industry premium rigs at competitive dayrates.This is a winning deal – for Transocean, for Ocean Rig and for the industry,” Cook concluded.last_img read more

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ADS Crude Carriers to Start Fitting Scrubbers on Its VLCCs

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license The newly established tanker owner and operator ADS Crude Carriers is about to fit scrubbers on board its very large crude carriers.   The company was set up in April this year in Cyprus, with a fleet of three VLCCs, built in Japan as sister vessels. The VLCC owner and operator plans to expand its fleet with more acquisitions.“After a period of start-up activities and building up the initial fleet of VLCC’s, the company will focus on streamlining the operations to maximize shareholder returns. In addition, the project of installing scrubbers on board the vessels for the purpose of reducing emissions and operating costs will be started.”All three ships have been delivered to the company and have secured employment, the company said in its first business results.The vessel Front Page, to be renamed ADS Eagle, was delivered to the company on July 20 and went directly to a charter as FSO west of Nigeria. The duration of the charter is between 150 and 210 days.ADS Stratus was delivered on August 9, 2018 and is on its way to an approximately 40-day spot charter for transport of crude oil. Finally, ADS Serenade was delivered on September 13, 2018 and will be trading in the spot market.The vessels have been put under commercial management of Frontline Management and technical management of OSM Ship Management AS.On August 28, 2018 ADS Crude Carriers Plc was accepted for trading at the Oslo Stock Exchange’s Merkur Market.last_img read more

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Faculty Renewal Challenge Requires Universities Governments Cooperate

first_img Maritime universities need to work with provincial and federalgovernments if the region is to successfully replenish theestimated 1,800 full-time faculty positions that will becomevacant over the next decade in the region, the Maritime ProvincesHigher Education Commission (MPHEC) announced today, Feb. 18. The vacancies come as the result of a wave of faculty retirementswhich are part of a nationwide demographic trend. Combined with ademand for new PhDs that exceeds supply, this situation iscreating a competitive hiring environment. The Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission (MPHEC)presented a document this week to the ministers of education ofthe Maritime provinces. Entitled Strategies for Faculty Renewalin the Maritimes, it outlines a series of strategies andrecommendations for universities and governments to prepare forthis “seller’s market.” “It is clear that the region must adapt quickly. Unfilledvacancies could threaten the very offering of programs andclasses,” said Sam Scully, commission member and chair of thecommittee that oversaw preparation of the document. “In theabsence of appropriate strategies to recruit and retain faculty,the Maritime provinces run the risk of being specificallyidentified by other jurisdictions as fertile ground from which torecruit faculty members.” “The key interventions presented in Strategies for FacultyRenewal in the Maritimes focus on three areas: expanding thecandidate pool, adapting recruitment practices, and developingmeasures to improve retention,” said commission CEO MireilleDuguay. “For example, measures to expand the candidate poolinclude increasing the number of suitable candidates through thedevelopment of new, multi-institution doctoral programs, and theprovision of additional support to PhD candidates and recentgraduates to facilitate their transition into faculty positions.” The document also recommends an overhaul of recruitment andretention policies and practices, including a review of salarystructures. For its part, the MPHEC has committed to preparing a progressreport in two years’ time; this report will include an update ofrelevant statistics and an account of regional developments andinitiatives. Maritime provincial governments and institutions areinvited to consider the recommendations and respond to thisdocument. “The potential impact of a do-nothing approach would likely reachbeyond the doors of the region’s institutions,” Ms. Duguay said.”Because the region’s universities have a significant impact onthe social and economic development, and are the primaryperformers of research and development in the region, any declinein the numbers and quality of Maritime university researchers andteachers would thus negatively impact the social and economicwell-being of the region as a whole.” Strategies for Faculty Renewal in the Maritimes is the outcome ofdiscussions among representatives of the region’s degree grantinginstitutions, faculty associations, graduate studentassociations, provincial governments, the Council of AtlanticPremiers, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada,and federal government agencies during the MPHEC’s Symposium onFaculty Recruitment and Retention, held in Moncton in October2002. The Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission wasestablished in 1974. Its mission is to assist institutions andgovernments in enhancing the post-secondary learning environment.MPHEC’s 19 members are drawn from the Maritime provinces andrepresent higher education institutions, provincial governmentsand the general public. The report is available on the website at: www2.mphec.ca/english/pdfs/Strategies2004E.pdf MARITIME PROVINCES HIGHER EDUCATION–Faculty Renewal ChallengeRequires Universities, Governments Co-operatelast_img read more

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Appointments for Human Rights Commission Announced

first_imgA former mayor of Bridgewater has been named the new chair of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. Ernest Bolivar is one of six individuals recently appointed to three-year terms on the commission, Michael Baker, Minister responsible for the Human Rights Act, announced today, Aug. 10. “Nova Scotia is fortunate that such dedicated people have agreed to take on this major responsibility,” said Mr. Baker. “They come from varied backgrounds and regions, which means they will bring unique perspectives to the important work of the commission.” Mr. Bolivar succeeds former chair James Dewar. Mr. Bolivar is the past president of the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities and the Nova Scotia Association of Police Boards, past chair of the Bridgewater board of school commissioners and a past executive member of the Resource Recovery Fund board. He was awarded the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal in recognition of his contributions to community. Five commissioners have also been appointed: — Ron Dawson of Dartmouth was appointed for his second term. He previously served as a commissioner for a two-year term from 2001-03. He is a former regional director for the RCMP Public Complaints Commission in the RCMP’s Prairie regional office. He was a regional director for the Department of Indian Affairs with responsibility for social development and then for the department’s executive secretariat. He is a past deputy director for operations for the Alberta solicitor general. — Prem Dhir is an author and retired teacher who lives in Truro. He is a past president of the Multicultural Association of Colchester County and the Multicultural Association of Nova Scotia. He remains an active member of the management committee for the annual Nova Scotia Multicultural Festival and currently serves as president of the Nova Scotia Community Links Association. He has received the Pettigrew Recreation Leadership Award from the Municipality of Colchester. — Eunice Harker of Sydney served for a number of years as a member of the Immigration and Refugee Board and consulted on immigration and international labour issues. She was a member of the working group that developed the board’s guidelines on gender-based persecution. These guidelines set a global precedent in women refugee protection. She has worked as program officer with Amnesty International and has a background in special education. She has been a researcher for the Canadian Union of Public Employees, a grievance officer for the Research Council Employees Association, a private consultant on discrimination in the workplace, and a mediator in the province’s restorative justice program. — David Samson, of Louisdale, served as superintendent of schools in Richmond County for 20 years. He is a member of the Nova Scotia Division of the Canadian Cancer Society and the Guysborough Antigonish Strait Health Authority. He is a former member of the board of governors of St. Francis Xavier University and the University College of Cape Breton. He began his educational career as a teacher at Isle Madame District High School in Arachat. — Narayana Swamy of Bedford was first appointed to the commission for a three-year term in July 2002. He is a past president of the Indo Canadian Association of Nova Scotia and helped to found the annual Nova Scotia Multicultural Festival. He was a founding member of the federal government’s Multicultural Business Advisory Committee. Mr. Swamy has operated his own businesses in Nova Scotia which included property management and accounting. Commissioners of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission are responsible for policy and have the authority to approve settlements of complaints, discontinue matters, or refer them to a board of inquiry for an independent hearing. Commissioners are not appointed to represent particular groups but uphold all the protected characteristics set out in the Human Rights Act. Staff of the commission investigate complaints of discrimination and promote settlement at all stages of the complaint process. Public outreach and training by staff complement the commission’s mandate to promote equality for Nova Scotians. “Nova Scotians can be assured that the human rights commission will continue to promote positive change and respect for difference,” said Mr. Baker.last_img read more

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Remaining Trail Bridges to be Repaired

first_imgTrail users should use caution around several trail bridges near Cambridge, Kings Co. The Spidle, Graves and McGee Brook bridges will be removed over the next few weeks for repair. The Spidle Brook bridge will be removed during the first week of August for replacement, with the Graves and McGee Brook bridges to be removed in the following weeks. As with the Sharpe Brook bridge, which was removed in July, work on abutments will be completed before a new bridge is put in place and opened. Abutment work is expected to take two to five weeks to complete, with the bridge replacement expected to take two to six weeks total. The four bridges are on an abandoned railway corridor, and were closed in June for safety reasons. Barricades and signs are in place to warn of the closures. Cornwallis River Pathways Society working with the departments of Natural Resources and Health Promotion and Protection to upgrade this section of the Kings County railway corridor for recreational trails.last_img read more

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Government Assistance to Help Reopen Pictou Lumber Mill

first_imgThe province is contributing to the reopening of Ligni Bel, a lumber mill in Scotsburn, Pictou Co. A $3 million loan guarantee, through the Industrial Expansion Fund, will help the company secure a $3 million operating line of credit from its commercial lenders. The line of credit will assist with the reopening of the mill and the restoration of jobs. “Ligni Bel has worked with its business partners and the province to develop a viable plan to reopen the mill and keep it operating, said Percy Paris, Minister of Economic and Rural Development. “This will restore valuable jobs and contribute to the local economy.” The Ligni Bel mill, which employed up to 75 people, shut down late last year. “We are pleased with this provincial support, which will help us bring our people back to work and generate spinoff benefits to the community,” said John White, Ligni Bel’s vice president and general manager. The Industrial Expansion Fund has invested almost $17 million in the forestry industry during the past few years. Last year, the province committed $2.52 million over three years through the Community Development Trust Fund. This assistance will support the industry with an action plan as it deals with changes in global market conditions. As a result of the worldwide economic and credit crisis, companies in Nova Scotia, like all of North America are having trouble accessing capital from banks. Through the Industrial Expansion Fund, the province is able to support businesses to be more competitive.last_img read more

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Human Rights Inquiry Finds Discrimination

first_imgAn independent board of inquiry found that Michael Trask was discriminated against by Nova Scotia Correctional Services because of his disability. After nine days of hearings that began in March 2009, board chair Donald Oliver found that Correctional Services had discriminated against Mr. Trask in the workplace. They failed to accommodate his disabilities. Mr. Oliver made a public interest finding, as he was not satisfied that what happened to Mr. Trask would not happen to someone else. He agreed that there was no one person responsible for the discrimination against Mr. Trask, but there was a systemic failure. The order is for extensive human rights training, overseen by the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, for Correctional Services. Damages have not yet been awarded to Mr. Trask, as the parties were given an opportunity to settle. “The commission is satisfied with the decision of the board chair. His understanding of how organizations work — that is, that there can be systemic failure that is no single person’s fault — is an important recognition of how discrimination can occur in the workplace,” said Krista Daley, CEO, Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission. “We look forward to working with Correctional Services by assisting them to increase their capacity to accommodate persons with disability.” The full decision is available at www.gov.ns.ca/humanrights/decisions.asp . All parties have a right to appeal decisions of boards of inquiry to the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal.last_img read more

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Education Leaders Add Expertise to NSBI Board

first_imgTwo well-known education leaders will share their industry expertise and innovative thinking as the newest additions to the Nova Scotia Business Inc. (NSBI) board of directors. Ray Ivany, president of Acadia University, and Bert Lewis, former principal of the Nova Scotia Community College Strait Area Campus, have been appointed to NSBI’s board. “Nova Scotia is home to many leaders whose world-class expertise continues to position our province to innovate, learn and compete,” said Percy Paris, Minister of Economic and Rural Development. “Mr. Ivany and Mr. Lewis will add great value to the NSBI board and will enhance the agency’s work to expand business activity in the province.” “These new members bring the drive and vision that’s needed to stimulate meaningful business growth in Nova Scotia,” said Jim Eisenhauer, chair of the board. “I look forward to their contributions.” Mr. Ivany and Mr. Lewis will sit on the human resources governance committee, which oversees policies and recruits new members. NSBI’s board of directors also has audit and investment committees. “We have a very strong group of business leaders representing our board,” said Stephen Lund, president and CEO of NSBI. “I’m looking forward to working with our new members to advance business development in the province. I’d also like to thank those members whose terms have ended. Their hard work has been invaluable to our entire team.” Larry Evans, partner with the law firm Evans, MacIsaac, MacMillan in Port Hawkesbury, and Doug Hall, former managing director with RBC Dominion Securities in Halifax, ended their terms late last year. Nova Scotia Business Inc. is Nova Scotia’s private-sector-led business development agency. NSBI is the investment attraction arm of the province and helps businesses in Nova Scotia meet growth potential through advisory services, trade development, financing and venture capital. For more information on NSBI’s board of directors, visit www.nsbi.ca/board .last_img read more

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Changes Support Reliable Bus Service

first_imgLegislation introduced today, Nov. 16, will help support reliable bus service across the province for students, seniors and others who rely on scheduled bus travel. “We’re responding to the concerns we’ve heard from many bus travelers and operators,” Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Maurice Smith said of the Inter-City Bus Service Act. “Nova Scotians want to know they can depend on a reliable bus service and bus operators want to be successful. These amendments strike that balance.” The bus industry in Nova Scotia, like many industries, has struggled with economic challenges for years. They have had to apply to the Utility and Review Board and attend public hearings for all applications, including requests to change tariffs, schedules and routes. This can be time consuming and costly. “The act will help to improve efficiency for bus operators and ease financial pressures which can sometimes lead to increase fares,” said Mr Smith. “These changes will also give operators the flexibility to meet the unique needs of rural parts of the province.” The act mean bus operators can make timely, reasonable changes to tariffs, schedules and routes without the cost of hiring a lawyer and attending a hearing. The responsibility for inter-city bus service will transfer from the Utility and Review Board to the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. The board will still be responsible for charter and commercial vehicles and school buses. For significant changes, there will an opportunity for written public input and the minister can also refer these requests to the board, if warranted. “I’m very pleased with the changes being introduced and the level of support from the Nova Scotia government,” said Mike Cassidy, Maritime Bus Owner. “It means we can now obtain quick decisions so we can better plan and strategize our operations to meet market demand in a timely manner.” Acadian bus lines announced in August it would discontinue bus service Nov. 30. The board accepted the application from Maritime Bus to replace Acadian Lines. All routes will be covered by bus or van.last_img read more

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Wallace Receives Spirit Award

first_imgA Cumberland County community has been recognized for its dedication to citizen engagement and civic pride. Wallace is one of three Nova Scotian communities selected for the 2013 Lieutenant Governor’s Community Spirit Award. Lt.-Gov. J.J. Grant presented the award at a community picnic today, Sept. 28, at the Wallace Recreation Field. The community received an original piece of Nova Scotian Crystal. “As the Queen’s representative in Nova Scotia, I am proud to honour the people of Wallace for their determination to overcome the challenges they face as a rural community and for their extraordinary efforts to enhance the quality of life for all their members,” said Lt.-Gov. Grant. Warren Hebb, who nominated Wallace, highlighted the community’s response to a fire that destroyed the only gas station in the area, its local history and year-round festivals as key examples of community engagement. “It is the countless hours provided by volunteers that make communities like Wallace good places to live in Nova Scotia,” said Mr. Hebb. “Nearly everyone will do what they can to assist a community endeavour be more successful.” In March, Nova Scotians nominated communities for the Lieutenant Governor’s Community Spirit Award. The department of Communities, Culture and Heritage co-ordinates the award, and applicants who best fit the award criteria are chosen by an independent selection committee. Along with Wallace, other 2013 recipients include Ballantynes Cove/Cape George, Antigonish Co., and Paqtnkek Mi’kmaw Nation, Antigonish Co. For more information, visit http://communityspiritaward.ca .last_img read more

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Government Breaks Ground on Kentville Dialysis Unit

first_imgConstruction has started for a new dialysis unit at the Valley Regional Hospital in Kentville. Health and Wellness Minister Randy Delorey was joined by hospital staff and members of the community to break ground on the new site today, Aug. 10. “Dialysis patients often make multiple trips for treatment each week,” said Mr. Delorey. “This new unit will allow many Annapolis Valley patients with more complex medical conditions to be treated closer to home.” Right now, many dialysis patients in the Annapolis Valley travel to the Western Kings Memorial Health Centre in Berwick for treatment. Others may have to travel to Halifax. The new 12-station unit in Kentville will replace the six-station unit in Berwick and will serve twice as many patients. There are about 24 patients currently receiving dialysis treatment in Berwick. The new unit will reduce travel for some patients, particularly those with more complex medical conditions who may have to travel to Halifax for treatment. Additional staff will be hired for the new dialysis unit in Kentville. “This is an exciting step forward for Valley Regional Hospital,” said senior medical director of Nova Scotia Health Authority’s renal program, Dr. Steven Soroka. “A new dialysis unit will be an integral part of the health care we provide in Kentville.” Construction is expected to be completed by winter 2020. Dexter Construction has been awarded the contract for the first of two phases. The first phase, underway now, includes excavating the building blueprint, removing unsuitable materials and re-routing a watermain for the new building addition.last_img read more

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Presentation of Sovereigns Medal for Volunteers

first_imgLt.-Gov. Arthur J. LeBlanc presented thirteen Nova Scotians with the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers today, Oct. 25, at an investiture ceremony at Government House, in Halifax. The Nova Scotians who received the medal today are: Many of the recipients who were recognized have volunteered for decades across numerous charities and organizations. Their voluntary activities include assisting children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, volunteering with the cadet movement, assisting with the preparation of tax returns and restoring a cemetery. “On behalf of the Queen and all Nova Scotians, it is a great pleasure and honour to recognize these outstanding people who have volunteered their time to help others,” said Lt.-Gov. LeBlanc. “Their voluntary efforts contribute to making this province a wonderful place to live and they set a fine example for others.” Established in 2016 by then Gov.-Gen. David Johnston, the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers recognizes the exceptional volunteer achievements of Canadians from across the country in a wide range of fields. As an official Canadian honour, the medal incorporates and replaces the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award. The medal builds on the legacy and spirit of the Caring Canadian Award by honouring the dedication and commitment of volunteers. Wendy Boyd, Bedford Darryl Cook, Bridgewater Kenneth Donovan, Sydney Lloyd Harris, Florence, Cape Breton Regional Municipality Joanne Hauser, Truro Christine Jamieson, Hammonds Plains Leigh Joiner, Lower Sackville Angus McDonald, Halifax Brian O’Brien, Halifax Kathryn Patterson, Dartmouth Vincent Penney, North Sydney Stanley Salsman, Halifax Henry Taylor, Sydneylast_img read more

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Kit Harington checks into wellness centre

first_imgLos Angeles: It seems like the end of ‘Game of Thrones’ has hit Kit Harington really hard as the actor has checked into a rehabilitation centre to receive treatment for stress, exhaustion and alcohol use. According to PageSix, the 32-year-old checked into a luxury health retreat in Connecticut weeks before the finale aired on May 19. He played Jon Snow across eight seasons on the HBO’s epic fantasy show. Harington has been doing cognitive behavioral therapy, meditating, and practising other psychological exercises to better cope with stress related to the ‘Game of Thrones’ ending. Also Read – ‘Will be acting till I die’Rose Leslie, the actor’s wife and former co-star, is “extremely supportive” of Harington. “The end of ‘GoT’ really hit Kit hard… He realized, ‘This is it, this is the end’. It was something they had all worked so hard on for so many years. He had a moment of, what next?” “He’s in the clinic predominantly for stress and exhaustion and also alcohol. His wife Rose is being extremely supportive. Everyone close to him really wanted him to get some rest. Right now, he just needs peace and quiet,” a source close to the actor told the outlet. He had previously admitted that he had to resort to therapy to deal with his character’s death in the show, which he said was his “darkest time”.last_img read more

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NCDRC directs Delhi school to pay compensation of Rs 75000 to its

first_imgNew Delhi: The apex consumer commission has asked a Delhi school to pay its former student a compensation of Rs 75,000 for causing mental agony and harassment by withholding his admit card. The National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) upheld the state commission’s order granting compensation to the student but set aside its direction cancelling recognition of the Bal Mandir Senior Secondary School, Vikas Marg, in the larger interest of other students studying there. Also Read – Cylinder blast kills mother and daughter in Karawal Nagar “The state commission has rightly awarded a compensation of Rs 75,000 for mental agony and harassment, including litigation charges, to the student. The order of the state commission is upheld to the extent of payment of Rs 75,000 towards compensation for mental agony and harassment including litigation charges,” the commission’s presiding member C Vishwanath said. “As regards initiation of proceedings for cancellation of recognition of the petitioner school, in view of the fact that several students studying in the petitioner school would suffer irreparable loss and injury in case of de-recognition of the school, in the larger interest of other students studying in the petitioner school, this direction of the state commission is set aside,” it said. Also Read – Two persons arrested for killing manager of Muthoot Finance In 2009, the student, Akash Agrawal was to appear for his board examinations. He had to skip a few classes because of his ill health and was not issued admit card by the school. He was only issued an admit card by the school after he approached a civil court. In the complaint filed by the student, he said that due to the late issuance of admit card, he was mentally disturbed and harassed, due to which he scored less marks than expected and therefore, could not get admitted in a good college. The commission said that it showed “negligence and deficiency in service” on the part of the school and by doing so the educational institution had kept the “future of students at stake”. “The state commission rightly observed that despite submission of medical certificate, the school had not taken any action to obtain condonation of shortage of attendance from CBSE,” the commission said.last_img read more

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