Providence St. Peter Presents “Women’s Night Out” for Heart Health Education

first_imgSubmitted by Providence St. Peter Hospital Regional Heart CenterThursday, October 17, at the Great Wolf Lodge, the Providence St. Peter Hospital Regional Heart Center will present a free community event featuring internationally-renowned physician, health coach, speaker and author Dr. Karen Wolfe.Heart disease is different for women. There’s a true connection between matters of the heart and heart health. And since women are most often at the center of family wellness, their example can nurture a heart-healthy family.Dr. Wolfe will help teach women to thrive, not just survive, by using her eight practical steps to family wellness.  “Women’s Night Out” will take place at the Great Wolf Lodge from 7-8 p.m.Health Fair prior to presentationDr. Karen WolfeAttendees can come early, 5-7 p.m., for a health fair including:Free health screeningsBlood pressureCholesterolBlood sugarHand grip strength How do I sign up?Seating is limited. To register, go to www.provregister.org or call 360.493.7247 or 360.330.8656.About Dr. WolfeDr. Karen Wolfe graduated from Sydney University Medical School, practiced primary care medicine, served as medical director of the Australian Government Health Service and earned a master’s degree in psychology – and she’s passionate about helping people live their healthiest possible lives. Today, Dr. Wolfe is an international speaker with a special focus on mind-body medicine and women’s health. She is the author of seven books, including Is Your Lifestyle Killing You?; From Stress to Strength; Medicine from the Inside Out; and Create the Body Your Soul Desires. Learn more aboutDiabetesHeart diseaseStroke riskSleep disordersMeet Providence Medical Group providerscenter_img Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Tumwater Mayor Appoints New Police Chief

first_imgFacebook4Tweet0Pin0Submitted by City of TumwaterMayor Pete Kmet is pleased to announce the promotion of Acting Police Chief Jon Weiks to the position of Tumwater Police Chief. Jon Weiks began working with the City of Tumwater as a Reserve Police Officer in 1987 and was hired as a full-time officer the following year. He has served in progressively responsible positions within the Tumwater Police Department since that time. Following the January 2017 retirement of Police Chief John Stines, Jon became the Acting Police Chief.Police Chief Jon Weiks. Photo courtesy: City of Tumwater.In making the appointment, Mayor Kmet said, “Jon Weiks has served his entire career focused on making Tumwater safer and making the Police Department highly professional. He knows our community and has the technical skills and management experience to lead the department as a trusted guardian of our community.”During his career, Jon has served in nearly every position in the Department. He has been a DARE Officer, Admin./Training Officer, Detective, Metro Traffic Officer, Crime Prevention/Community Liaison, Background Investigator, Department Review Board Member, and Major Collision Investigator. He was a Collision Investigation Instructor at the State Criminal Justice Training Commission. He twice commanded the Thurston County Reserve Police Officer Academy. And has twice been the Department’s Officer of the Year. Jon was promoted to Police Commander in 2008.Jon is a Tumwater native and graduate of Tumwater High School. He spent many hours working at his family grocery stores, Mega Foods and Frontier Foods. Of the opportunity, Weiks said, “It is an honor to be able to lead the men and women of the Tumwater Police Department. I’m committed to the Tumwater community and engaging with the other parts of the City, our partners, and the people of Tumwater to make it a safe place to live, work, and visit.”The Tumwater Police Department has 33 commissioned officers and provides the full range of law enforcement services, including patrol, evidence processing, prisoner transport, and code enforcement. In partnership with the Tumwater School District, the Department manages a nationally-recognized School Resource Officer Program. The Department participates with other City departments in an innovative multi-disciplinary approach to pedestrian and vehicular safety issues, called Traffic Team.An employment agreement will be presented to the City Council at their meeting on May 2 meeting.last_img read more

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If You’re Going to Put All Your Eggs in One Basket,…

first_imgAlaffia’s new winged basket is the perfect handmade accessory. Photo courtesy: AlaffiaAlaffia uses wild harvested savanna grasses, which are stripped and twisted to craft the unique and creative designs. The Winged Baskets feature extended side panels providing a more stylish look and storage space. Each basket takes a week to make and beautifully displays the talent and skill of Ghanaian weavers.Alaffia’s basket weaving program began in 2004. The program now employs 260 basket weavers at the Alaffia Village in Sokodé and over 1,975 grass collectors in Blitta. The Ghana basket cooperative is made up of 4,950 individual weavers, who each have a contract with Alaffia, guaranteeing a fair trade price for each basket.Every single Alaffia basket is unique; none are mass-produced. In 2015, Alaffia began adding tags in every basket that has the weaver’s name, village, country, and a lot code linked to the month it was woven. This allows each weaver to be recognized directly for their work and artistry.The Authentic Handwoven Basket collection also includes the Market version, Mini Market, Shoulder, and Oval Baskets. The full selection can be viewed at the Alaffia website.About AlaffiaAlaffia, located in Olympia, Washington and Togo, West Africa, was founded in 2004 to alleviate poverty and empower communities in West Africa through the fair trade of indigenous resources. The raw ingredients used in their body care products are handcrafted using traditional techniques at cooperatives in Togo, which employ over 500 women. The finished products are produced in Olympia. Alaffia’s sales are reinvested into West African communities through Empowerment Projects, which aim to advance gender equality and eradicate poverty. Alaffia’s product lines include Alaffia, Authentic, Everyday Shea, Everyday Coconut, Beautiful Curls, and Queen Alaffia. Alaffia was named Whole Foods Market’s 2014 Supplier of the Year, Thurston County’s 2014 Employer of the Year, and Nutrition Business Journal’s 2016 recipient for Mission and Philanthropy. Facebook150Tweet0Pin0Submitted by AlaffiaAlaffia, a fair trade organization waging war on poverty in West Africa, introduces a new basket style. The Winged Basket is the first update since Alaffia’s initial offering of hand woven baskets.last_img read more

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Christmas Tree Recycling for Thurston County Residents

first_imgFacebook72Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston County Board of County CommissionersWhen the holidays wind down and the decorations get packed away, it’s time to figure out what to do with the Christmas tree. This season, free tree collection and drop off opportunities are available countywide.To prepare your tree for recycling, please remove all ornaments, lights, stands, nails, and tinsel prior to drop-off. Flocked trees are accepted.Drop-off LocationsAll Thurston County residents: Trees are accepted at the Waste and Recovery Center located at 2420 Hogum Bay Road NE in Lacey from December 26 – January 13 (closed January 1). Hours of operation are Monday – Friday from 7 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., and Saturday – Sunday from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.Rainier residents: Take trees to the Rainier Drop Box Facility at 13010 Rainier Acres Rd. from December 28 – January 13. Hours of operation are Friday – Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.Rochester residents: Take trees to the Rochester Drop Box Facility at 16500 Sargent Rd. from December 29 – January 13. Hours of operation are Tuesday, Saturday, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.Tenino residents: Residents can take trees to 418 S. Wichman St. from December 29 – January 19.Yelm residents: Residents can place trees in a designated dumpster at Yelm City Park anytime from December 28 – January 11, or until the dumpster is full.Pick Up InformationLeMay yard/food waste customers: Place your tree in or near your yard/food waste cart (in sections 3 feet or less). Extra fee(s) apply for customers not signed up for yard/food waste collection. Call LeMay at 360-923-0111 for information.City of Lacey residents: Local Boy Scouts will provide curbside pick-up of holiday trees on Saturday, January 6, for residents within the Lacey city limits. Trees must have all decorations removed and be on the curbside in front of homes by 8:00 a.m. The Boy Scouts accept donations for this  community service. Donations can be made online at www.troop222wa.org, or BSA Troop 222, PO Box 5379, Lacey, WA 98509.  Contact Lacey Public Affairs at 360-491-3214 or publicaffairs@ci.lacey.wa.us for more information.City of Olympia garbage customers: For customers with Tuesday/Wednesday service, tree pickup will be on January 5. For Thursday/Friday service, pick up will be on January 12. Place trees in the regular pick-up spot by 6:00 a.m. Trees over 6 feet must be cut in half. Call City of Olympia at 360-753-8340 for more information.City of Tumwater residents: Residents can place undecorated trees behind the curb near their closest main intersection beginning January 14. Please be sure to keep sidewalks, bike lanes, and roadways clear when dropping off trees. It may take several days for crews to pick up all trees.  Contact Tumwater Public Works at 360-754-4150 for more information.Multi-family complex residents: Check with your property manager for tree placement locations.Featured photo courtesy: City of Laceylast_img read more

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COVID NEWS: Comcast/Xfinty Offers Free Entertainment for WA Residents

first_imgFacebook112Tweet0Pin0Submitted by ComcastComcast announced that it has made the on demand catalogs from a series of premium networks and subscription video on demand (SVOD) services available for its Xfinity X1 and Flex customers to enjoy starting with SHOWTIME, EPIX, CuriosityStream, HISTORY Vault, Grokker Yoga Fitness & Wellbeing, The Reading Corner and DOGTV.“This is an unprecedented time and we want to be there for our customers to help make the time they’re spending at home easier with free previews from our network, studio and streaming partners,” said Rebecca Heap, SVP of Video & Entertainment at Comcast.Xfinity customers with X1 and Flex can simply say “Free” into their Xfinity Voice remote to explore the range of subscription programs currently available as part of the free on demand event spanning kids educational content, fitness and TV & movies, including:SHOWTIME – all X1 customers can enjoy 30-days of all the series and movies the network has to offer including Billions, Homeland and Shameless. Xfinity Flex customers will be able to watch select originals such as City On A Hill and Kidding.EPIX – 30 days free of the full EPIX catalog of thousands of movies, along with acclaimed original series including Godfather of Harlem, Pennyworth, War of the Worlds and the highly-anticipated Belgravia, premiering April 12.CuriosityStream – 60 days free of the top 300 award-winning documentaries and series on science, history, wildlife, adventure, travel and more. Explore your world and beyond with shows including Ancient Earth and The History of Food.DOGTV – the whole family is covered with 30 days free of programs for dogs, as well as dog-related programs for all dog lovers.Grokker Yoga Fitness & Wellbeing – 30 days free of expert-led video classes in fitness, yoga, meditation and healthy cooking.HISTORY Vault – 30 days free of a deep offering of classic series, probing documentaries and cutting-edge specials. From series like Modern Marvels to specials about ancient cultures, HISTORY Vault is the one-stop destination for exploring the past, present and future.Kids Room – 30 days free of a wide selection of popular series filled with vivid stories and beloved characters. Popular children’s series include Bob the Builder, Polly Pocket, and Strawberry Shortcake.The Great Courses Signature Collection – 30 days free of engaging and educational video lectures from the world’s greatest professors. Hundreds of subjects to learn; from photography to psychology, guitar to genetics, or mindful health to a vast exploration of history.The Reading Corner – 30 days free of reading videos on themes such as spring, holiday, school and nature. For children up to 10 years old. Stories include Donuts: The Hole Story, This is a Book Full of Monsters, and Beauty and the Beast.Xfinity plans to open up more preview content from dozens of new networks, studios and streaming partners on a rolling basis over the coming weeks.Beyond free entertainment, Comcast has undertaken a comprehensive COVID-19 response inclusive of opening Xfinity WiFi hotspots across the country to anyone who needs them for free (including non-Xfinity Internet subscribers), pausing data plans, creating a COVID-19 news destination on X1 and Flex, and making its Internet Essentials program free for new families for the first 60 days of enrollment.last_img read more

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Holmdel Service Station Wants To Offer A Mini-Mart

first_imgBy Joseph SapiaHOLMDEL ­– For more than 25 years, Tony Crisalli has operated the sole gas station and automotive repair shop in the heart of Holmdel’s historic Village section, at 46 Main Street and Route 520/Holmdel Road.Three years ago, when ExxonMobil was looking to get rid of company-owned gasoline stations, Crisalli bought the property.Now, he is looking to change the business – replacing the repair service with a mini-mart, while continuing to pump gasoline.Although the business has operated there since the 1950s, it would not comply with today’s Business-1 zoning. Some think Crisalli’s plan to change the business would be detrimental to the Village, an area of century-old churches, homes, real estate businesses, small commercial buildings and the large Vonage campus.The plans for the property, about 8/10 of an acre, include converting the approximately 1,400-square-foot building’s two repair bays into the store. About 300 square feet would be added to the building’s east side to accommodate a refrigerator for the store.Striped parking spaces would be added, along with a canopy over the gasoline pumps, said Crisalli, 64, a township resident.Crisalli seeks variances from the township Zoning Board for such things as allowing a gasoline station and convenience store in the B-1 zone and allowing less-than-minimum setbacks from the roadway right-of-ways for things such as a sign and the canopy.Michael Rauchwerk, who lives in the Willow Road area about a mile from Holmdel Village Exxon, is concerned how changes will affect the Village.“It’s a nice center of town,” Rauchwerk said. “Businesses close at 5 p.m. (Then) no traffic. I’m not sure how it will fit in with Holmdel Village. It’s a rather small property.”In the approximately 30 years Rauchwerk has lived in the area, the Village “hasn’t changed a lot.”“The whole downtown area has kind of a look,” said Rauchwerk.The property is not well-maintained now, but now it has no canopy, Rauchwerk said. The canopy, which will extend almost to the road right of way, was a specific concern of Rauchwerk’s.“The property is basically staying the same,” Crisalli said. “The asphalt is going to be brand-new.”The building will get a new roof and the east wall will only be expanded a few feet, Crisalli said.“The same building cleaned up and made to look better.”As for the canopy, it protects workers and pumps from the elements, Crisalli said.“It does help protect our investment,” Crisalli said. “If self-service (gasoline pumping) goes through, how many people would want to pump their own (in bad weather)?”When Exxon owned the gasoline station, it operated seven days a week from about 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., Crisalli said. Now, he said, it operates about 6 a.m. to 7:30 or 8 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. If the zoners approve the changes, according to Crisalli, the business hours would be an estimated 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. every day.If Crisalli’s plans are approved, he would no longer do automotive repairs at the site. Instead, his plan is to move the repairs elsewhere in the Holmdel area.There is no timetable on opening the mini-mart, Crisalli said.“We’re just going step by step,” Crisalli said.The Zoning Board began hearing the application May 4. It will continue the hearing June 1, 8 p.m. at Town Hall.last_img read more

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Regional Ocean Plan Laudable, But Does Not Go Far Enough, Says…

first_imgStory and photo by Joseph SapiaWhen a regional plan was adopted that unites scores of federal, state and native American agencies, concerned with Atlantic Ocean issues from New York to Virginia, environmental groups applauded.They want to see the Mid-Atlantic Regional Ocean Action Plan, adopted Wednesday, Dec. 7, by the federal government’s National Ocean Council (NCO), properly implemented.But Clean Ocean Action, a Sandy Hook-based environmental group, questioned if the plan stopped short.The plan formally unites an estimated 140 or so agencies to discuss such issues as transportation, commercial fishing, wind power, recreation and national security to 200 miles offshore of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. The idea of the plan is if groups communicate and share information now, rather than working independently, they will avoid disagreement in the future.“This plan will connect federal, state and tribal agencies in ways that will serve the public need, while protecting our irreplaceable resources,” said Helen Henderson, ocean planning manager for the Sandy Hook-based American Littoral Society environmental group.“The plan represents the next level in collaborative and inclusive management for ocean resources,” said Matt Gove, Mid-Atlantic policy manager for the California-based Surfrider Foundation, a surfing-environmental group that has an area Jersey Shore chapter.The American Littoral Society called the Mid-Atlantic “environmentally and economically crucial.” The area, home to more than 34 million people, generates $2 trillion, or 14 percent, of the county’s annual gross domestic product,according to the society. Tourism and recreation alone in the Mid-Atlantic generate $30 billion, providing 600,000 jobs, according to the Surfrider Foundation. “We need to make sure that economic driver, and the clean ocean and beaches it relies upon, is protected going forward,” Gove said. The plan not only provides for better communication and coordination between the various agencies, but supports consolidating data and identifies research needs, said Zach Lees, a policy lawyer for the Sandy Hook-based environmental group Clean Ocean Action (COA). But the group believes the plan doesn’t go far enough.“The plan should have included specific commitments from agencies to protect and safeguard the Mid-Atlantic communities, clean ocean economies and marine life and habitats from oil and gas development, harmful industrialization and climate change impacts,” said Lees.“We’re not overly impressed,” said Cindy Zipf, COA’s executive director. “Yes, it was a step in the right direction. But it didn’t add protection for the ocean. “An oil economy and a clean ocean economy don’t mix,” Zipf said. The Mid-Atlantic Regional Planning Body (RPB), part of the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, put together the plan. The RPB released a draft July 6.The RPB then held five forums on the draft in the Mid-Atlantic, including one July 14 at Monmouth University. Representatives of COA, Surfrider Foundation and American Littoral Society were among the 45 groups that turned out for the local forum.Henderson said “years of time, effort and dedication are represented in this new plan.”The plan has its roots in 2009, when President Barack Obama created the Ocean Policy Task Force to foster better stewardship of the oceans and Great Lakes. In 2010, Obama created the National Policy for the Stewardship of the Ocean, Coasts and Great Lakes.center_img “Throughout this effort, our goal has been to ensure that the plan will be a blueprint for conservation and management to protect the ocean and its natural resources,” said Tim Dillingham, the American Littoral Society’s executive director. “This final action plan will be the foundation.”“Now is when the real work begins,” said Sarah Winter Whelan, the American Littoral Society’s ocean policy program director. “Implementation will bring another set of opportunities and challenges for us to ensure conservation prevails in this plan.”last_img read more

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Historic State Drug Bust Led by Monmouth County

first_imgMonmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni held up a Nerds Rope candy like ones found laced with THC in the “Operation On The Ropes” drug bust. Photo by Allison Perrine At the facilities, candies would be unwrapped, laid out in trays and sprayed with concentrated THC distillate. Once the candies dried, they would be repackaged as illegal marijuana edibles and distributed throughout New Jersey. But if there is a silver lining to a case “as sad and serious” as this one, is that hopefully, this will draw further attention to the need for a vaping prohibition. McCabe also said there is added danger in not knowing howmuch THC is in each edible. “The dangers of overindulgence of edibles is thehighest when compared to the other ways to ingest marijuana.” MONMOUTH COUNTY – Twenty-four men and women have beencharged in connection with a multimillion-dollar, large-scale marijuana and THCtrafficking organization. Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccionicalled the arrests “one of the largest drug busts in state history.” Of the 24 individuals charged in the investigation, oneCalifornia man, Anthony Dalessandro, remains at-large, said Gramiccioni. Anyonewith information about his whereabouts is asked to contact the MCPO. The yearlong investigation, dubbed “Operation On The Ropes,”was led by the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office (MCPO) Narcotics andCriminal Enterprise Unit. The prosecutor stressed how dangerous this can be for people,especially for children in the community. Members of the drug ring infused popular brand-name candieslike Nerds Rope and Sour Patch with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), “the substancethat is responsible for creating a marijuana high,” Gramiccioni said. Though hecould not say exactly how long the ring was operating, he estimated it went onfor several years. The MCPO also seized nearly $1.5 million in cash, over $10 million in assets and 21 luxury vehicles. Gramiccioni gave thanks to the many federal, state, countyand municipal law enforcement agencies that assisted in the investigation –more than 35 altogether. At the press conference, the MCPO had a 50-pound bale of hayon display to give reporters a visual comparison to the marijuana seized.According to Gramiccioni, officers seized the equivalent of 22 bales of marijuanafrom the operation. At a press conference in Freehold at headquarters Jan. 7, theprosecutor’s office displayed a tray of ordinary, commercially available candieslike Sour Patch Watermelons, Nerds Rope and gummy Mini Burger, similar to the THC-infusedcandies found in the investigation. John McCabe Jr., Monmouth County chief of detectives, saidhe has not seen a case like this in his 33-year career. He, too, stressed theimportance of sending the right message to children and other adolescents thatvaping is dangerous. “The perception that vaping is healthier than smoking isabsolutely false,” he said. Referring to a report by the Center for DiseaseControl, McCabe added that as of December 2019 there have been over 2,561 lunginjuries and 55 deaths related to vaping. Police seized about 21,000 packages of infused candies, an estimated 1,100 pounds of suspected marijuana, as well as over 6,000 flavored THC vape cartridges and additional paraphernalia, the MCPO announced, with a street value of about $1.9 million. The illegal operations were conducted in Monmouth, Ocean andBergen counties, and parts of New York and California, police said. In MonmouthCounty, a warehouse on Park Avenue, off Route 33 in Manalapan Township, as wellas a hangar at Monmouth Executive Airport in Wall Township, were used asproduction and storage facilities, Gramiccioni said. “The counterfeit candy looks nearly identical to what anyonecould buy at any convenience store or supermarket,” said Gramiccioni. “Colorfuland sugary candy like what we seized are among the best-selling edible potproductions in the black market,” he added, and they “constitute an extremedanger to our community, particularly the children in all of our communities.” Anyone looking to remain anonymous can contact Monmouth County Crime Stoppers at 1-800-671-4400 or can text MONMOUTH and their tip to 274637. Emails can be sent through the website at monmouthcountycrimestoppers.com. This article originally appeared in the Jan. 9, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — Nelson U13 Selects

first_imgThe Nelson U13 Selects started the rep season off on fires, capturing the gold medal at the recent Kootenay South Youth Soccer tournament in Fruitvale. The Selects breezed through the competition en route to the gold medal. Mallard’s Source For Sports would like to salute the Selects with Team of the Week honours. The team includes, back row, L-R, coach Paul Dawson, coach Dino Falcone and managers Damien and Maya Engelbrecht. Middle, Oscar Seagram, Stryder Scott, Nigel Ziegler, Ben Cameron, Joey Timmermans, Amit Bhabra, Akira Engelbrecht, Jake Anderson, Darian Johnson, Sam Barrett and Andrew Falcone. Front, Juna Williams, Taylor Pritchard, Bryce Twible, Quinn Dawson and goalkeeper, Parker Shaw-Lintz.last_img read more

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Ice brass continues to prepare players for upcoming BCMMHL season

first_imgThe Kootenay Ice Major Midget squad was back on the ice this weekend at the NDCC Arena gearing up for the upcoming season.The Ice, part of the 11-team B.C. Major Midget Hockey League, is coached by Mario DiBella and assistant Sean Dooley.The staff put the team through practice Saturday before the players was split up for the intra-squad game Sunday morning.More than 50 players attended the three-day camp earlier the month.Following the tryout camp some players were released as the coaching staff looked to get down to a manageable number.Some of the players signed include Cole Arcuri of Nelson and Scott Davidson and Jake Lucchini of Trail.Other committed to the program include Seth Schmidt and Jason Richter of Cranbrook, Quinn Klimchuk and Darren Medeiros of Castlegar, Colby Livingstone of Creston, Mitch Foyle of Beaver Valley, Jeremy McGregor of Grand Forks and Craig Martin of Trail.The B.C. Major Midget Hockey League is for players 15, 16 and 17 year old.In 2010-11 the Kootenay Ice finished 10th overall with an 8-25-7 record. DiBella said the coaching staff is looking for a few exhibition games against Okanagan competition during the Labor Day weekend.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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